Did I Mention Step Training ?

Having trouble with the reblog concept … I need a trainer for blogging

The Year I Touched My Toes

The Trainer had been to the Annapurna area in the early eighties and knew how important step training would be to our success in getting to Everest Base Camp.

That’s me in 2013. We didn’t make that time but it wasn’t because of our training regime.

Everest Base Camp Trek Everest Base Camp Trek Trail 2013

Donkeys climbing down steps on the lower part of the the EBC trail The donkeys taking it slowly coming down the steps

So we kept up step training for our 2015 EBC Trek training. The purple pack was our 2015 trek when we made it to Everest Base Camp and Kala Pattar.

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That’s me with blue pack in September 2018 when we trekked to the Gokyo in the Everest Base Camp region.

The walk into Khumjung lots of easy welcome steps.

Stairs coming into the town of Khumjung in the Khumbu Nepal Easy climb down the stairs after the strenuous climb up out of Namche Bazaar

Below is the very loose rocky steps not far below the first lake before Gokyo lake.

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Thank You For Everest

To My Valentine Trainer

We met in Egypt. And had four days together. He made me laugh, something clicked and there was that spark. We talked about me visiting him in Milan but as a teacher it had to be the school holidays and it seemed way too long off. We exchanged details and said goodbye. Back home I decided to go with my gut instinct. I rang him a few weeks later. Very happy to hear from me, he asked when I was going to visit. I responded with my flight details for my arrival at Lineate Airport four months later.

We had twelve wonderful days in Italy. After that there was no looking back. The remainder of the year was a romance of long distance calls and then he returned to his hometown Melbourne. We spent the summer holidays together and then I returned to Whyalla to teach and he stayed in Melbourne to work. Then one day he flew on two planes to Whyalla and proposed and flew back the next morning.

Six months later in January we travelled to Italy to live. He thought it would be a good idea to escape the cold Italian winter before settling in. I liked the idea of a nice Thai beach somewhere.  Well I got the sand and the T stuck too. Translated, the Sahara Desert and Timbuktu.

North West Africa was not my idea of a holiday but it was an adventure, like I had never experienced. We bumped around Algeria, Niger, Mali, Senegal and The Gambia for three months. And yes, we got to Timbuktu.

Everest Base Camp was just another remote place not on my travel plan. However, this adventure required a certain level of fitness and training. And so, my husband became The Trainer.

The Trainer designed our training plan, cajoled, encouraged, and nagged to keep me on track to make sure we would make our EBC trek in the best condition and without aches and pains.

He was the trek researcher, designer and organiser, packing mastermind and photographer. If it wasn’t for the Trainer I would not have been to this amazing part of the world and had this wonderful experience.

One friend said to me, “You’d follow him anywhere.” She’s right, I probably would.

the view above Periche on the way to Dughla EBC Trek Trail
Another Perfect day in the Khumbu

To my Valentine Trainer … the best is yet to come.

The 101 on Trekking in the Everest Base Camp Region

Above Pheriche, Everest Base Camp Trek, Nepal
So much more than Base Camp

A Basic Overview To Everest Base Camp Trekking 

Whether you have just returned from your first taste of hiking somewhere spectacular like Machu Picchu and are thinking about tackling the Everest Base Camp trek. Or your neighbour has just returned from their third trek in Nepal and you’re thinking there must be something in it. Or you have been thinking about trekking in Nepal for a while. Whatever the reason and you know next to nothing about trekking in Nepal, this post is for you.

This is the 101 on trekking in the Everest Base Camp region also features some photos of the Gokyo region. Gokyo is the less popular trek but is very beautiful and less crowded.

#Macchermo lodges #Gokyo Area #Everest Base Camp region #Khumbu #Nepal
Simple Accommodation Stunning Location – Macchermo, Gokyo area 

It is a good idea to decide when and where you will trek twelve months in advance to give yourself plenty of time to prepare and research. This is the case whether you are trekking with or without a tour operator. Being prepared for what the trek is like is critical. Mental preparation is everything. Everything.

Basic Points About the EBC Region when you know absolutely nothing

  • EBC stands for Everest Base Camp.
  • You can’t see Mount Everest from Everest Base Camp. You get your first view of Everest on the climb to Namche Bazaar.
  • The highlight of trekking to Everest Base Camp is the view from Kala Patthar. Not Base Camp. You can see Everest and the rest of the mountains from Kala Patthar. You can climb to Kala Patthar to see Everest at sunrise, sunset, late morning or early afternoon. You do not need to be a mountaineer to get this view.
Climbing Kala Patthar October 2015
The innocent looking path to the top of Kala Patthar was the hardest few hours of our 2015 trek for me. The large mountain on the left is Pumori.
  • There is no road to Everest Base Camp, Nepal.
    Everest Base Camp and Gokyo are in the Khumbu region.
  • Most people start their trek by flying to Lukla. The closest road is two days walk from Lukla at Jiri or Saleri.
Sign to Jiri from the main EBC trail
The signage to Jiri and Salleri two days walk from the main trail 
  • Everything needed along the track comes in on foot. Gas for cooking, food, housing and building supplies are carried up by donkeys, yaks and porters. The porters do the hardest carrying, carrying weights of up to 140 kilos.
  • Understandably food and drink are more expensive the higher you go up the trail.
Tenzing Hilary Airport Lukla Nepal
Waiting for the next four planes to land at the Tenzing Hilary Airport
Porters Load along the EBC Trek trail
Meet the doko. You will see lots of these with your food and drink up the track
  • The trail is in a remote part of the world, but people live at points along the track. On the lower parts of the track you will see children walking to school. Tell this to the folks back home to stop them worrying about your planned adventure.
Children running home from school EBC trek trail Nepal
Children running home from school
  • People worry about altitude sickness on the trek, but it is avoidable.
  • I have met people worried about altitude sickness affecting them because they had experienced it ascending mountains in the Andes in a bus! This happens because you are ascending too fast. It doesn’t happen trekking to the Base Camp region if you plan your ascent according to the altitude rules.
  • Your altitude acclimatisation starts in Kathmandu at 1,400 metres or 4,500 feet. Don’t sign up with a trekking company that counts Kathmandu as day 1 of your trek. 
trekking gear
Training is key to you managing and enjoying your trek.
Camping an Lodge accommodation in Dole Gokyo region Nepal
Camping and lodge accommodation in Dole on the way to Gokyo
  • Trekking to Everest Base Camp is achievable with an average fitness level but you need to train so you don’t experience any pain and you enjoy it.
  • People of all ages trek along this track.
  • Click here to read how we trained for our treks to Everest Base Camp.
Lodge in Phakding EBC trail
The lodge we stayed in Phakding on the way up and on the way down in 2015.

Lodge in Dole in the Gokyo Valley Nepal

ACCOMMODATION 

  •  If you trek to Everest Base Camp you don’t have to sleep in a tent.
  • If you decide not to camp, then you will stay in a lodge. They used to be called tea houses.
  • Accommodation is basic. Very basic. I am talking basic beds, blanket and pillows. Usually some sort of shelf along the window, maybe some coat hooks. No mirror and no power points. 
  • Bathrooms are basic. Sometimes you can get a toilet in your room. Showers are generally communal except in the more expensive lodges and maybe in some lodges in Phakding.
  • There are some nicer hotels in Namche Bazaar and there is the Yeti Group along the lower part of the track. But remember the infrastructure is not there for the fabulous plumbing and heating, regardless of the price.
  • In Namche Bazaar for a moderate rate you can have your own reasonable bathroom, western toilet and power points and mirrors.
  • A shower each day is not possible. Wet hair on the trail is a problem and there are no power points for a hair dryer to dry your hair.
  • You don’t have to carry a huge pack with food etc because there are lodges all the way along the track spaced at strategic points and they can cook your breakfast and dinner.
  • The basic accommodation is very cheap. The lodges make their money from the food. You must eat your evening meal and your breakfast in the lodge.
  • It is customary to pre-order your meals ahead of time, so they can get organised. below is the standard menu along the trail.
  1. Food is basic.
  2. It is not advisable to eat meat along the trail or in Kathmandu.
A lodge in Phakding Nepal
Lodges usually sell some basics 

Trek with a company or independently but trek with a guide or a porter guide

The Porter guide and me Above Macchermo on the way to Gokyo
Dilip our Porter guide with me above Macchermo on the way to Gokyo

Planning – Decisions before you leave for the Everest Region

  • Who you are going to go with?
    • Decide carefully who you want to go on this trekking adventure with. Because it might not be their dream destination, or cup of tea. I know. Because that was me. But, now I have just returned from my third trek in the Everest Base camp region. And planning a fourth. Trekking in Everest Base Camp region is addictive.
    • If your planned travelling companion is very particular about accommodation – maybe you can go with someone else OR they just give it a go. It’s worth it for the spectacle views … 
Spectacular View from Dingboche Ridgetop
Imja Chola River from above Dingboche

When You Can Trek To Everest Base Camp 

Why are you going ?

  •  If you want to go all the way to Everest Base Camp make sure you have an itinerary no less than 14 days Lukla to Lukla NOT including arrival in Kathmandu.
  • Importantly there is a chance you won’t get to Base Camp. On our first trek in 2013 we didn’t, and you need to be prepared for that. Pushing on could cost you your life. You can always try again another time. There is no shame in not getting to EBC.
  • You might be happy enough just to experience trekking and the big mountain panoramic views. Then maybe trekking to Namche Bazaar is far enough. Or you could go a bit farther to Thame or Khumjung. It is still a fantastic experience with great views. Dingboche is further with fantastic massive landscape views.

The Number of Days Trekking to Everest Base Camp is the Most Important Factor to Get to Base Camp Safely 

Your Trekking Options. How Will You Trek ?  

  • with a tour group, or independently with a guide and porter or a porter guide?
  • will you book before you leave home or in Kathmandu?

Research, Book, Buy and Train, Train, Train

Know What to Expect  – Mental Preparation is Everything 

  • We researched our gear by going to all the trekking shops and buying in store.
  • Buy gear early unless you want to buy it in Kathmandu, which I don’t recommend.
    • Buy your boots early. You need to wear them in. 
    • Start shopping for your best airfare options – we buy our air tickets only few months before our departure – just in case circumstances change
    • Research insurance, costs of a porter etc
  • Read some blog posts and get an idea on what to expect
    • Read about
      • the accommodation
      • the food
      • what the trail is like
      • look at some maps on the internet
      • look at Google Earth along the track
      • buy or borrow a range of guide books
      • watch some YouTube videos
    • It is important one person going knows what to expect each day. If you have a guide, they will tell you each night what to expect the next day. A porter/ guide, may not speak English as well as a guide, but they will be able to tell you on how long it will take you to get to your next destination and a rough description of the trail. Even with the porters and guides it is a good idea to know what you are signing up for before you book your trek and airfares. Do your research before you book anything.  
  • Train with your trekking clothes and your day pack and some weight. Try a drink bottle with an increasing amount of water to increase the weight slowly.
  • Train, train and train   

Best Months to Trek in the Mount Everest Base Camp Region?

The best times to trek and the seasons in the Everest Base Camp region

  • April, May – when all the rhododendrons are flowering, the warmer of the two seasons and the busiest because the Mount Everest climbing season is in May. A lot of people and food and equipment move along the track in April.
  • October to December – a colder but less busy season. There is chance of clouds in the afternoon and of some snow in higher parts
    • We have only trekked in this season. It was quiet for us because there were no flights for about three or four days.

Months to Avoid Everest Base Camp Trekking

  • January and February is winter and cold. A few people do trek then. But why would you?
  • August and September are the monsoon season. Lots of rain and clouds can obscure the views and there is the possibility of landslides lower part of the track.
September 2015 between Mongla and Portse Tenga Nepal
You can be unlucky with the weather …

After You Decide to Trek to EBC Region – Research Some More

  • Research your trek – the destination and the route
    • Build flexibility into your itinerary.
  • A great tip is to plan 2 to 4 buffer days. A tight deadline is not what you want. You might get sick, or feel unwell or miss a flight in or out.

https://bearfoottheory.com/planning-your-everest-base-camp-trek-logistics/

  • Begin your training 3 to 6 months before you go depending on your fitness level
    • 3 months if you are reasonably fit and need targeted training
    • 6 months if you want to establish general fitness first

Research and Preparation Equal Success for the Everest Base Camp Region treks

 

We Are Off for Trek Number 3 in Nepal

We’re off to Trek in Nepal. Again.

Above Dingboche Everest Base Camp trek

Above Dingboche Everest Base Camp trek

Yes, I am in love. In love with the Nepalese landscapes and with the simplicity of the trekking in Nepal. A colleague asked me what’s the attraction, she knows it is my third trek.

Why Go to Trek In Nepal?

If you ask The Trainer (aka my husband) he’d say he’s doing it to keep me fit! In fact, the need to keep up a general level of fitness and then to train four times a week for two or three months before we leave for Nepal, is a big side benefit. But I really liked the feeling of achievement after taking on the challenge of trekking to Everest Base Camp. And feeling so incredibly fit from the simple days, sustained walking, fresh air and fresh food walking through magnificent landscapes. It felt amazing. And I was glowing when I returned home.

Good Planning is Important for a Successful Trek

Signage in the Khumbu

Although we have to the Everest Base Camp region twice before or maybe, because we have been before, I am conscious to not become blasé about what we are about to do.

  1. We have kept up the training.
  2. We (that would be the Trainer) have researched the route and itinerary options
  3. We are reviewing what we are taking. I have bought a new Osprey day back pack.
  4. We are reviewing the packing list
  5. We reviewed the drug list – the Trainer bought out the chemist
  6. We checked in with our contact in Kathmandu that everything is on track with flights to Lukla, organising our Porter and getting our TIMS Card
  7. We have booked our hotel in Kathmandu

So, we fly to Nepal in two weeks. I am very excited to be staying at the Kathmandu Guest House when we arrive and when we leave. If it is good enough for Ricky Martin, it’s good enough for us too.

We are trekking independently again but will be taking a porter/ guide, like on our second trek.

Trekking to Gokyo Ri and the Gokyo Lakes

We are going back to the Khumbu, the Everest Base Camp region but we are trekking to Gokyo. The trek is marketed as Gokyo and the Glacial lakes. If you read the trekking tour blurbs this is what they list as the highlights.

  • Stand at the shores of a chain of six turquoise, glacial-fed lakes
  • Hike along Ngozumpa Glacier, the largest glacier in the Himalaya
  • Avoid the Everest crowds, but enjoy the selection of great views
  • Climb Gokyo Ri (5,357 m) for spectacular views of Everest, Lhotse, and Cho Oyu
  • Trek through the Sherpa town of Khumjung, home of a ‘real’ yeti skull
  • From ‘Scoundrel’s viewpoint’ near the fifth lake, peer over the vast Ngozumpa Glacier a wasteland of rock and ice

Khumjung Everest Base Camp trek September 2015

Walking into Khumjung

In fact the view from Gokyo Ri is meant to be better than the view from Kala Pattar on the Base Camp trek. Also, weather permitting, we will be crossing over Cho La Pass. We haven’t done that before. Climbed a pass. This will be a hard a long day. Easily the hardest.  But we will only go if the weather is good otherwise it can be treacherous. We have a day and a buffer day at Gokyo to help with this. We have been told that the walk to Fifth Lake is well worth while.

And in true Nervous Nelly style I am anxious about it. Again. This time I am anxious about the pass. However, the Trainer is talking me up. Cho La Lou he is calling me. Cho La Lou, Queen of the High Passes. Sort of has a nice ring to it doesn’t it ?

Everest Base Camp trek

 

Any advice on the Cho La Pass an Gokyo, comments are very welcome.

Nepal Captures Your Heart Forever

Himalayan Landscapes Are Forever in Your Heart

I have become addicted to wanting to walk in these landscapes. Forever.

Main Everest Base Camp Trail

Well at least one more time. But then I know it will be one more time. Again.

That’s me on Day 13 of our Mount Everest Base Camp trek returning to Lukla. From the top of Kala Pattar we had the closest view of Everest, two weeks before I turned 58. That was October 2015. Now, we just have to go again. Back to see, and be a part, of these massive landscapes.

Flying to Lukla

All my reservations  left me when I saw the first vista from the plane flying to Lukla.  And my eyes filled with tears. In 2013 it was the first time I had ever done anything like this – hike or trek. Me, walk all the way to my next destination? Never.

EBC Trek Day 2

On the lower part of the trek the vistas are smaller. Remember it’s all relative. The noisy river, the trees, the small villages along the trail. And the bridges which cross back and forth over the river. The blue roofs are at Benkar and our porter is a little up ahead with the orange pack.

Then there is the iconic bridge which features in in the movie Everest. After crossing the suspension bridge and the fast moving Dudh Kosi river below there is the steep big climb to Namche Bazaar.Bridges across to Nacmhe Bazaar hill

Day 4 Above Namche Bazaar heading towards TengbocheIn the photo above look closely at the bottom point of the river to see the two bridges. Looking back at different points and seeing how far you have come gives you a great sense of achievement. It’s all part of the addiction. Lodges in Nepal

There can be amazing views even from your room. The climb to Namche Bazaar is worth the view. You can even climb higher, pay more and stay at the Everest View Hotel and get a view of Everest.  Above Namche Bazaar on Acclimatisation Day

I love the view of the two rivers below. The two bridges in the photos above cross where the two rivers meet. The day before I had walked alongside the river. There was a bit of cloud and rain as it was the very end of September. But we didn’t get wet.

Namche Bazaar to Tengboche EBC Trek

When we flew to Lukla the first time there was an man sitting next my husband who was on his seventeenth trek to Nepal. I told you it was addictive. He pointed out the mountains by name. I want to be able to recognise all the mountains and name them too. The one above is Ama Dablam, she is distinctive and easy to spot.

EBC Trek Walking to Dingboche

Above the tree line and blue skies. The track levels out in places.

Day 7 EBC Trek to DingbocheLittle hamlets and big views. Part of the attraction is no crowds. I loved Dingboche and the acclimatisation day walk above it. Half way up the hill you can see the C-shaped track above the stupa and to the right. That’s about 400 metres above the town and where the flag pole below was. The views were stupendous. I loved it.

View of mountains above the small village of Dingboche on the EBC Trek

There are walks to be taken from Dingboche so I just have to go back…

EBC Trek Dingboche to Lobuche

EBC Trek Dingboche to Lobuche

The massive landscapes put things in perspective.

Above Pheriche, Everest Base Camp trek

You could look at the view forever but you have to move on to the next amazing vista.

EBC Trek near Gorak Shep

And the views feel so special because you have “worked” and walked to get there. Note the people in the bottom left hand corner.

Gorak Shep and Kala Patthar

And when you get to your final destination and climb that final brown hill and stand in front of Everest and above Everest Base Camp…

On top of Kala Patthar in October

you understand it’s not just about getting there. The whole journey and the effort to get there is special. But be warned. It’s addictive.

Everest Base Camp in the morning

A morning view from Mount Everest Base Camp.

Posted on February 1, 2018 by Louise Terranova

The EBC Trek Trail in 20 Photos

How Difficult is the EBC Trek ? Here it is in photos.

Part of the answer to how difficult the EBC trek is, is about what you are walking on. This shows why you need to do step training. And hill training of course.

Main Street Lukla, setting out on Main Trail EBC Trek

Cobblestones in Lukla, there are flat parts through villages in the lower part of the trail.

EBC Trek Before Phakding after Ghat
When down hill is uphill too. And lots of steps.

EBC Trek Between Phakding and Monjo
Watch your step.

Lower suspension bridge over the Dudh Khosi taken from the higher bridge
One of the Bridges at Namche Bazaar.

EBC Trek Above Namche Bazaar
Rocks and rocky paths.

EBC Trek Coming Into Khumjung
Smooth path into Khumjung after a big climb.

EBC Trek Above Upper Phakding
Windy paths along the side of mountains,

EBC Trek Heading Towards Dingboche
The hills look innocent enough here but the altitude is increasing.

EBC Trek Towards Dingboche
Paths widen over turf

Bridge at the confluence of Khumbu Khola and the Imja Khola Nepal
and over rivers

EBC Trek Heading towards Dingboche
Flat but at altitude don’t rush.

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla
Across turf at 4,000 metres

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla above Periche
From Dingboche to Dughla above Periche

EBC Trek To Gorak Shep
To Gorak Shep an amazing part of the trail. Lots of rocks to pick your way over.

EBC Trek near Gorak Shep
The path from above…

EBC Trek The climb up to Kala Patthar
The hardest walk to Kala Patthar. Over 5,500 metres.

EBC Trek almost to Base Camp
Walking the last few kilometres to Base Camp.

Everest Base Bamp Trek
There are hills to go up as you go back down to Lukla. These are marathon runners.

Coming down from Tengboche EBC Trek
Coming back down can be slippery with those little loose rocks.

EBC Trek Looking back towards Periche
There are still hills coming down and the magnificent views in reverse.

The thing to understand about these photos is on the really big climb days to Namche Bazaar and to Tengboche – you are too exhausted to take photos. And the photos don’t really show the steepness of the climb.

Lukla-EBC-KP-Gorakshep_Elevation Profile
Here is a elevation profile I found. The triangular peak represents the acclimatisation day walk above Dingboche.

Dingboche My Favourite Day

Tenzing Got There First

Our Acclimatization Day in Dingboche

Yes thank you to our Porter .. Basanta he was lovely… for always watching out for me.

I loved , loved, loved this day and Dingboche. I could go back to this part of the world every year.

Ok there is a fuzzy bit in the video but – who cares….

Who is coming next time we trek here ?

Don’t forget to check out my Home Page Our Itinerary for our Everest Base Camps Treks

 

Beautiful One Day Breathtaking the Next

A Photo is Worth a Thousand Superlatives

Above Pheriche, EBC Trek, Nepal

From the moment you walk out of Lukla to trek to Everest Base Camp the views are beautiful. The higher you go the more amazing the views, higher again the views become breathtaking panoramas. Continue reading

Step Training? Affirmative

Three Months Until Your EBC Trek? Get Training

Do I need to include steps in my training ? You bet. By the end of your training you should be able to do 1 hour of steps with a ten minute break in the middle.

Main Everest Base Camp Trail between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche treacherous steps but a great view.

There’s the man with the vision and the all the plans. Trek to Everest Base Camp, Nepal. He had been to trek the Annapurna circuit in the 80s and he knew there is a lot of uneven ground so he insisted on finding uneven hills to train on and lots of stairs too.

And stairs were in abundance …..

Between Lukla and Phakding
Eveerest Base CAmp trek trail
Aproach to bridge at Jorsale
trekking Phakding to Monjo Everest Base Camp Trek September 2015
Between Phakding and Monjo
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Donkeys making their way down these stairs – wait for them to pass.

Everest Base Camp trek

Kids an their way home from school running down the stairs. October 2015

Outside Monjo towards Namche Bazaar

An eighty plus year old woman with 40 kilos plus of cabbages, beating me down these stairs. November 2013

Everest Base Bamp Trek
Everest Base Camp Marathon day 2015

Base Camp Marathon runners after Tengboche heading to Namche Bazaar. October 2015

If you are planning a trek on the Annapurna Circuit or to Everest Base Camp and you’ ll be there in three or four months you need to start your incline training, or hill training now. Find some good hills close to home to start walking them twice a week with a more intense session on the weekend.  All you need is one good hill with some uneven ground. Go up the hill turn around and go back up. Turn around and do it again and again. Ad nauseum.

Find Some Stairs to Train on

We did stair training for the last two and half months once a week and twice a week for the last six weeks. We started off at ten or twenty minutes building up to 45 minutes to an hour. Up four flights , down four flights. You get the picture.

EBC Trek
There’s the river between the trees…
Namche to Tengboche
Approaching some tricky steps …
Everest Base Camp Trek
Almost there! The infamous climb to Namche Bazaar almost finished.

November 2013

Oh course you will be rewarded by fabulous views at the top … before you go down hill to go up again…

Everest Base Camp Trek Tips

  1. Practice with your boots and all your gear.
  2. Buy trekking poles to protect your knees, especially going down hill. Train with them before you leave for Nepal. I mean for a few months at least. If you not used to them you will really feel the pain.
  3. We recommend taking a porter and or porter guide. The photos of me with the orange pack are our 2013 trek without a porter. The shots with the small purple pack were taken on the 2015 trek when we took a porter guide.
  4. Remember your step training and then you will enjoy your trek.
  5. Go slow. Slowly, slowly. Bistari, bistari. It is not a race.
  6. And remember another reason you train and do all of the above – the elevation see Everest Base Camp Trek Elevation profiles and my comments.

Om Mane Padme Hum

Monastery or Gompa at Khumjung Nepal

Khumjung Monastery

Khumjung Monastery Khumjung Nepal

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Gompa at Khumjung

IMG_0462Khumjung Monastery

The colour on the inside was a welcome warmth from the cloud that had descended on the town for most of the day. The monastery is the red building you can see on the right.

This monastery has the famous yeti skull. I don’t think it is right for me to have a photo of that here. You will have to go and see for yourself and pay a donation for the privilege.

Photos taken 25 September 2015. The weather can be still a bit tricky at the end of September.  Also posts on the same day

 

All Things Yak on the EBC Track

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Meeting Yaks on the Track

On the Everest Base Camp trek you might see mountain goats, magnificent eagles and other beautiful birds but the yaks were my favourite along the trail.

These hardworking animals are the delivery vans on the EBC trail. There are no roads. Everything goes up and down on the back of a donkey, yak or a porter.

yak

Yaks between Shomare adn Digboche

The First Rule of the Track – Stand Aside for Yaks

I loved the sound of the yak bells as they approached. Hearing the bells is a signal to find somewhere safe to stand on the mountain side and wait while they pass. The first rule of the track. If you are caught standing on the outside of the path you risk being knocked off the side of the mountain. The baby yak in the video had his own plans about which path he would take.

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The walled sections of grassland above are yak pastures between Shomare and Dingboche. Not only do these wonderful animals carry packs and food up the trail they also provide fuel. The woman was collecting dung from the yak pasture to dry to use for cooking and heat.

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A young girl resting with her basket full of yak dung behind her.

Shop front Everest Base Camp Trail

Yaks, well really the naks which are the females, provide milk which in turn is made into cheese which you probably will find on top of your pizzas on the trek.

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This guy just would not move. I really think he wanted his photo taken. Say Yak Cheese!

Many travel experiences provide possibilities of  interactions with animals, wild ones if you are lucky.

Some animal travel memories of mine are seals on Kangaroo Island when I was a child, monkeys in Bali, passaperos (dog walkers) and their packs of dogs in Buenos Aires, llamas in Argentina and a day spent riding camels in the desert in Rajasthan. But hundreds of dolphins in the mouth of the Gambia River was probably my most magic wildlife experience. It took us totally by surprise and was amazing. Do you have any special memories of animal encounters while you traveled?

Other I things I loved on the Everest Base Camp Trek.

Unbelievably most of the photos and the video show yaks without loads! Which means they were on return journeys. The photos were taken in 2015 when the season was extremely slow after the earthquakes. I’ll have to get a good full load photo next time.

 

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Simple Not Basic

A Post about Food on the EBC Trek Becomes More. Or Is it Less?

There is a difference between basic and simple. Especially when you are traveling.

Recently I posted about accommodation on the EBC trek being basic. A comment from a fellow blogger (thanks Miriam) made me rethink how I had labelled  the accommodation. It is the very fact the Everest Base Camp Trek is basic, makes it so good. Basic can be seen as a negative.  So simple, not basic, is a better word to use. Because it is the simplicity of the EBC trek that makes it so special.

Gorak Shep the end of the Everest Base Camp trek
Walking into Gorak Shep the end of the Everest Base Camp Trek

The simplicity of the accommodation, the simple food, the every day simple routine. The early to bed, early to rise. Get up, get dressed, eat,  leave. Which way to go? Up or down. Maps to consult? No, not really, there is one path. Just like a pilgrimage, you know where you are going and why. The people you meet, the common quest, the simplicity of the destination but the challenge of getting there make it special. A quest so well rewarded.

No phone calls, television, emails and internet access is limited. All put into perspective in the big landscape or simple path you are on. Up or down.

And yes,  simple meals too. This simple meal below in  simple surroundings is one I remember well. A bowl of hot simple potato soup made with the broth and grated potatoes. A well earned bowl of soup after a hard steep walk out of Namche Bazaar and a 600 metre trek down hill to the river to Phunki Tenga.  Three hours plus of a hard work, it was a meal well earned.  A simple meal, simple surroundings the roar of the river, the sound of the yak bells as the yaks pass. Simple stunning beauty all around.

Potato soup at Phunki Tenga at 3250metres EBC Trek trail

So back to the food, yes the food is simple. But it is good. It is organically grown along the track and cooked in a simple kitchen.

Vegetables growing in the Khumbu

Food in a Namche Bazaar lodge

A meal in Namche Bazaar above.

Potato Soup Nepal

This bowl of potato soup was al fresco at Debouche on the trail down. In a stunning landscape. How much simpler and more beautiful can you get?

December 2013

The umbrellas above,  weren’t the norm. The Sherpa stew was.

Vegetables growing on the EBC Trail

Simple, but addictive. Everest Base Camp Trek too simple to say no.

Need more convincing?  25 Reasons to Trek To Everest Base Camp

Trekking to Everest Base Camp ? Are you up to it?

Stupa at Khumjung

Two photos of a Stupa in Khumjung taken from different directions and two years apart. Photos taken in December 2013 taken end of September 2015, two earthquakes later.

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There is a beautiful mani wall along the walk in from Namche Bazaar.

Stupa at Khumjung in the Khumbu region of Nepal

I assume the cracks are from the second earthquake on May 12 2015. The small boy in the photo has his back pack on and had just come out from the Edmund Hillary School, the biggest school in the Khumjum.

April 25 earthquake magnitude 7.8

May 12 earthquake magnitude 7.3

Two Earthquakes and Two Films – another of my posts

Worth a look earthquake 2015 – Great Himalyas Trail website

Drying Hair and Potatoes in the Khumbu: Behind the Scenes EBC Trek

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Drying potatoes in the sun in Pangboche Nepal

Pangboche, Everest Base Camp Trail, December 2013

Wordless Wednesday

Earth, Dingboche Ridge-top, Nepal

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A Favourite Day on the Everest Base Camp Trek

Dingboche Ridge-top Everest Base Camp Trek

To celebrate Earth Day April 22

Read about our Acclimatisation Walk to Dingboche Ridge-top probably one of my favourite days on our trek.

Or the walk into Dingboche or the walk out to Lobuche.

Daily Post: Earth Photo Challenge

Things I Liked List

Things I liked on the Everest Base Camp Trek

Boxes of ancient papers Khumjung Manastery Nepal

  1. momos
  2. the first day walking to Phakding
  3. walking everyday
  4. talking with Dawa in Lukla
  5. hearing the rush of the river
  6. hearing the yak bells
  7. the vista in Dingboche
  8. the feeling having climbed to the top of Kala Patthar
  9. seeing eagles soaring high above
  10. the boxes of papers in the monastery at Khumjung
  11. the hot shower in Dingboche
  12. hearing the stone masons and the noise of the town above Namche
  13. the donkey trains
  14. sitting at our meals at the end of the day with a sense of achievement
  15. water
  16. black tea
  17. everything yak

with inspiration from this lovely blog  https://listsofthingswelike.com/

via Daily Prompt: Minimal

Dawa Phuti Sherpa Community Leader

Dawa Phuti Sherpa in the Paradise Lodge Lukla

For some time I have planned to write a post about this amazing woman who I met on both our Everest Base Camp treks. Both our treks started out from her  Paradise Lodge in Lukla after breakfast, after our early flight to Lukla. We stayed our last night in Lukla before our morning flights back to Kathmandu at the end of our treks.

This photo was taken after our evening meal in her lodge in October 2015. Due to the two earthquakes that year, it was a quiet night guest wise in the lodge and so she had some time to sit down and talk to me about her work in the Khumbu. The reason I knew to ask about her work in the community was  because on our 2013 trek we found a hotel directory with some information about Dawa and her husband Ang Pasang.

I have taken the information from the directory.

Dawa Phuti Sherpa

  • Born in Khunde
  • First Sherpa woman from the Khumbu region to attend school
  • Served as a nurse in the Khunde Hospital
  • Served as a teacher in the Khumjung School (The Edmund Hilary School)
  • Has been working in the hospitality industry for thirty years
  • Chairperson of the women’s group
  • Board member of the Himalayan Trust Nepal
  • Board member of Pasang Lhamu Nique Hospital Lukla
  •  Recipient of the Friends of Khumbu
  • Recipient of the Peace Ambassador
  • Recipient of the Nava Durga award

Needles to say she is very busy with running the lodge and all the community work she continues to do. What better day than International Women’s Day, to acknowledge Dawa Phuti Sherpa’s wonderful work in the Khumbu both past and present.

Paradise Lodge Dining Room

Inside dining room at Paradise Lodge talking with Dawa

Nava Durga Award in Nepal

Celebrates Womanhood started in 2002 as an annual event to celebrate the vision, inner beauty and power of women. The objective is to honour women in various fields of arts, education, sports, community service, health and industry and to applaud their dedication to their respective fields. Shrijana Singh Yonjan, the mind behind the event says that each award has been named after a goddess and the attribute she signifies. The awards recognise nine different fields of achievement (Nava Durga).

Nav Dugra Maa

Nava Durga Maa

Leaving Lukla Memorial to Pasang Lhamu the first Nepalese woman to summit Everest.

Pasang Lhamu Memorial Gate outside of Lukla