Plan Your Nepalese Trek with a Flexible Itinerary

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Starting Out On A Trek

Trekking Poles – Don’t Leave Home Without Them

A good friend walked part of the Camino a few years ago. I remember word for word his comment about trekking poles. I must admit they do help but it does look like you have an affectation.

The Trainer (my husband) put it more succinctly. You look like a wanker. He said to me. Lots of wankers on this trail then. I replied to him and took off down the trail. With my trekking poles.

I am a big fan of trekking poles and wouldn’t leave home without them. For this trek it helped us with some very tricky parts of the trail where it was quite dangerous getting down onto the Ngozumpa Glacier. But I am getting ahead of myself.

If you watch the video you will see at a certain point I start to trip and right myself. The reason this happened was because I was trying to watch exactly where the porter guide was stepping and trying to step on the same steps he did while I was watching where I was stepping too. I learnt by watching the porter they always find the easier way to follow a path. They find the steps that have the lower rise etc. You watch a Nepalese person walk the path and see what I mean.

The Number of Days on a Trek and the Amount the Altitude Increases Each Night is Critical

The Trainer designed our trek to sleep no more than approximately 300 metres higher each night. Every 1,000 metres you should have an acclimatisation day. Climb higher on the second acclimatisation day on a day walk but sleep at the same altitude for two nights. Of course there is an anomaly with this, on the lower part of trek when you are starting out. It kicks in around Namche Bazaar.

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Confessions of a Scaredy Cat on Top of Cho La Pass

Is Crossing Cho La Pass Dangerous?

In my opinion the answer to the question is yes. You bet it is.

  • 5 October 2018
  • Cho La Height : 5368metres / 17,611 feet
On top of Chol La Pass with the Porter Guide, Nepal

That is our porter guide on the left and that’s me with the worried look on my face. We are on top of Cho La Pass. Even though I had made it to the top with a whole lot of help from our porter I was feeling anxious. Very worried. And scared. Very scared. And just wanting to get off the top and safely to our lodge in Dzongla for the night and before any weather set in. I could include a bucket load of expletives in this post but I haven’t, I’ll just let you imagine them. Lots of them.

My husband of over thirty years took the photo and managed to get a smile out of me eventually. I wasn’t feeling too charitable towards him and had told him so earlier in the morning after we walked out of Thangnak. Just before what I think was my first ever panic attack. Not bad since it wasn’t the first time he had taken me out of my comfort zone. Except this time took the cake.

Trekker and Porter Guide on top of Cho La Pass Nepal
Our Porter Guide (left) and my husband on top of Cho La Pass

Saying I worry too much is a bit of an understatement. From a young age I had a keen sense of my own mortality. As a child, being in a head on car collision and later a narrow miss with a runaway speed boat didn’t help the cause. For me it spelt out “it can happen to you too.”

It was my husband’s idea to trek in Nepal. He had trekked the apple pie circuit in the Anna Purna area in Nepal the 1980s. He loved it and had talked about taking our daughters as young children.This never happened.Then in 2013 the plan was to trek with them as adults but it improved impossible to coordinate everyone’s various work commitments to find dates when everyone was available. In the end my husband decided to go anyway and I didn’t want to get left home worrying about him, so I went even though I was really scared about it.

Just what was I scared about?

I was terrified I would die somehow. I was worried I would

  1. fly to Lukla and crash into the side of a mountain and die,
  2. get lost and freeze to death,
  3. break an ankle on the side of the mountain, be stranded and freeze to death,
  4. get robbed and killed,
  5. get knocked off the side of the mountain by a yak and die
  6. fall off the side of the mountain and die
  7. be caught in a rock fall and die

so what did happen on the way to base camp?

On our first trek in 2013 I got a rash. Yes a rash. Because I thought the rash was cellulitis (a bacterial skin infection which can kill you) we turned back at Shomare or Somare. Had we been trekking with a porter guide instead of totally independently things may have turned out differently. We decided to return in 2015 and try again and this time we made it to EBC and Kala Patthar. I wasn’t worried about any of the things on the list above. I had a different list with just two dot points. Landslides and another earthquake.

Last year in September/October 2018 my husband wanted to trek to Gokyo a destination I was happy about. But he also wanted to go over Cho La Pass which I was definitely not happy about. I tried to talk him out of the idea. This time bullet points number two and number seven were high on my worry list. Rock falls at Cho La Pass are a real possibility as is freezing to death on top if the weather comes in.

what is the climb like to the top of cho la pass?

The next photo below really puts a bit of perspective on the climb. Click on the photo and it will open up so you can see people climbing about a third of the way up. Every picture tells a story as they say.

Trekkers climbing Cho La Pass Close Up Nepal
Trekkers climbing up Cho La Pass

Climbing this area was down right dangerous. Anyone who tells you differently is in denial. Climbing Cho La Pass made going to Everest Base Camp and climbing Kala Patthar put together seem like a picnic. And the thing is you don’t have a choice. If you start out you need to keep going. You just want to get over the Pass and down on the other side which is also dangerous and make it safely to your lodge to sleep. We trekked for ten and half hours on that day. We stopped for the briefest lunch on top of the Pass as it is so cold up there.

On side of stupa Lower track EBC trail before Phakding
Decoration on the side of a newly renovated stupa on Day One of our trek in Cheplung.

A woman recently asked me whether I was really scared because I went anyway. Yes I was scared about the idea of climbing over Cho La Pass. Really scared. Why did I go? I would follow that Trainer anywhere. Well almost. And clearly, I didn’t get my She – Lion on enough before we left Australia, when I argued constantly that I did not want to climb Cho La Pass because it sounded dangerous. I should have bared my teeth a bit more.

And yes we made it all the way safely and now I’m back home in Melbourne, writing about our third trek in the Everest Base Camp region. I can tell you we won’t be climbing Cho La Pass again nor trying our luck with Renjo and definitely not Kong Ma the other two of the three passes in the region either. However our love affair with trekking in Nepal continues and a fourth trek to another region is on the cards. We are addicted to Nepal.

My next post will be Day 1 and 2 from Lukla to Namche Bazaar as we trekked with our porter guide. I will revisit this climb and the whole of Day 10 as it unfolded from Thangnak, over Cho La Pass and to Dzongla in detail in another post but in order of the days as we trekked. Hope this is taster for you to following our journey.

Does anyone know the name of the animal on the side of the stupa?

To Climb to the Top of Gokyo Ri or Not Too ?

Decisions in The Khumbu Nepal

Ngozumba Glacier Above Goyko Gokyo Lake and the town og Gokyo

I made the choice because I could. I would wait for him and we would walk back down the slippery tracks together. You can plan and prepare for a trek, but you can’t control fate. I had caught a cold just before leaving Melbourne for Nepal and for eight days I had coughed my way through the Khumbu. Now more than three quarters of the way up to Gokyo Ri I was exhausted.

I was content because I had climbed high enough to still have a spectacular view. I sat looking out across the huge Ngozumpa Glacier that we would cross tomorrow. Tomorrow I would have no choice but to go on.

Above Gokyo Lake climbing to Gokyo Ri Everest Region Nepal

For the EBC Trekking Cognoscenti it wasn’t the Khumbu Cough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ngozumpa_glacier

Thank You For Everest

To My Valentine Trainer

We met in Egypt. And had four days together. He made me laugh, something clicked and there was that spark. We talked about me visiting him in Milan but as a teacher it had to be the school holidays and it seemed way too long off. We exchanged details and said goodbye. Back home I decided to go with my gut instinct. I rang him a few weeks later. Very happy to hear from me, he asked when I was going to visit. I responded with my flight details for my arrival at Lineate Airport four months later.

We had twelve wonderful days in Italy. After that there was no looking back. The remainder of the year was a romance of long distance calls and then he returned to his hometown Melbourne. We spent the summer holidays together and then I returned to Whyalla to teach and he stayed in Melbourne to work. Then one day he flew on two planes to Whyalla and proposed and flew back the next morning.

Six months later in January we travelled to Italy to live. He thought it would be a good idea to escape the cold Italian winter before settling in. I liked the idea of a nice Thai beach somewhere.  Well I got the sand and the T stuck too. Translated, the Sahara Desert and Timbuktu.

North West Africa was not my idea of a holiday but it was an adventure, like I had never experienced. We bumped around Algeria, Niger, Mali, Senegal and The Gambia for three months. And yes, we got to Timbuktu.

Everest Base Camp was just another remote place not on my travel plan. However, this adventure required a certain level of fitness and training. And so, my husband became The Trainer.

The Trainer designed our training plan, cajoled, encouraged, and nagged to keep me on track to make sure we would make our EBC trek in the best condition and without aches and pains.

He was the trek researcher, designer and organiser, packing mastermind and photographer. If it wasn’t for the Trainer I would not have been to this amazing part of the world and had this wonderful experience.

One friend said to me, “You’d follow him anywhere.” She’s right, I probably would.

the view above Periche on the way to Dughla EBC Trek Trail
Another Perfect day in the Khumbu

To my Valentine Trainer … the best is yet to come.

The 101 on Trekking in the Everest Base Camp Region

Above Pheriche, Everest Base Camp Trek, Nepal
So much more than Base Camp

A Basic Overview To Everest Base Camp Trekking 

Whether you have just returned from your first taste of hiking somewhere spectacular like Machu Picchu and are thinking about tackling the Everest Base Camp trek. Or your neighbour has just returned from their third trek in Nepal and you’re thinking there must be something in it. Or you have been thinking about trekking in Nepal for a while. Whatever the reason and you know next to nothing about trekking in Nepal, this post is for you.

This is the 101 on trekking in the Everest Base Camp region also features some photos of the Gokyo region. Gokyo is the less popular trek but is very beautiful and less crowded.

#Macchermo lodges #Gokyo Area #Everest Base Camp region #Khumbu #Nepal
Simple Accommodation Stunning Location – Macchermo, Gokyo area 

It is a good idea to decide when and where you will trek twelve months in advance to give yourself plenty of time to prepare and research. This is the case whether you are trekking with or without a tour operator. Being prepared for what the trek is like is critical. Mental preparation is everything. Everything.

Basic Points About the EBC Region when you know absolutely nothing

  • EBC stands for Everest Base Camp.
  • You can’t see Mount Everest from Everest Base Camp. You get your first view of Everest on the climb to Namche Bazaar.
  • The highlight of trekking to Everest Base Camp is the view from Kala Patthar. Not Base Camp. You can see Everest and the rest of the mountains from Kala Patthar. You can climb to Kala Patthar to see Everest at sunrise, sunset, late morning or early afternoon. You do not need to be a mountaineer to get this view.
Climbing Kala Patthar October 2015
The innocent looking path to the top of Kala Patthar was the hardest few hours of our 2015 trek for me. The large mountain on the left is Pumori.
  • There is no road to Everest Base Camp, Nepal.
    Everest Base Camp and Gokyo are in the Khumbu region.
  • Most people start their trek by flying to Lukla. The closest road is two days walk from Lukla at Jiri or Saleri.
Sign to Jiri from the main EBC trail
The signage to Jiri and Salleri two days walk from the main trail 
  • Everything needed along the track comes in on foot. Gas for cooking, food, housing and building supplies are carried up by donkeys, yaks and porters. The porters do the hardest carrying, carrying weights of up to 140 kilos.
  • Understandably food and drink are more expensive the higher you go up the trail.
Tenzing Hilary Airport Lukla Nepal
Waiting for the next four planes to land at the Tenzing Hilary Airport
Porters Load along the EBC Trek trail
Meet the doko. You will see lots of these with your food and drink up the track
  • The trail is in a remote part of the world, but people live at points along the track. On the lower parts of the track you will see children walking to school. Tell this to the folks back home to stop them worrying about your planned adventure.
Children running home from school EBC trek trail Nepal
Children running home from school
  • People worry about altitude sickness on the trek, but it is avoidable.
  • I have met people worried about altitude sickness affecting them because they had experienced it ascending mountains in the Andes in a bus! This happens because you are ascending too fast. It doesn’t happen trekking to the Base Camp region if you plan your ascent according to the altitude rules.
  • Your altitude acclimatisation starts in Kathmandu at 1,400 metres or 4,500 feet. Don’t sign up with a trekking company that counts Kathmandu as day 1 of your trek. 
trekking gear
Training is key to you managing and enjoying your trek.
Camping an Lodge accommodation in Dole Gokyo region Nepal
Camping and lodge accommodation in Dole on the way to Gokyo
  • Trekking to Everest Base Camp is achievable with an average fitness level but you need to train so you don’t experience any pain and you enjoy it.
  • People of all ages trek along this track.
  • Click here to read how we trained for our treks to Everest Base Camp.
Lodge in Phakding EBC trail
The lodge we stayed in Phakding on the way up and on the way down in 2015.

Lodge in Dole in the Gokyo Valley Nepal

ACCOMMODATION 

  •  If you trek to Everest Base Camp you don’t have to sleep in a tent.
  • If you decide not to camp, then you will stay in a lodge. They used to be called tea houses.
  • Accommodation is basic. Very basic. I am talking basic beds, blanket and pillows. Usually some sort of shelf along the window, maybe some coat hooks. No mirror and no power points. 
  • Bathrooms are basic. Sometimes you can get a toilet in your room. Showers are generally communal except in the more expensive lodges and maybe in some lodges in Phakding.
  • There are some nicer hotels in Namche Bazaar and there is the Yeti Group along the lower part of the track. But remember the infrastructure is not there for the fabulous plumbing and heating, regardless of the price.
  • In Namche Bazaar for a moderate rate you can have your own reasonable bathroom, western toilet and power points and mirrors.
  • A shower each day is not possible. Wet hair on the trail is a problem and there are no power points for a hair dryer to dry your hair.
  • You don’t have to carry a huge pack with food etc because there are lodges all the way along the track spaced at strategic points and they can cook your breakfast and dinner.
  • The basic accommodation is very cheap. The lodges make their money from the food. You must eat your evening meal and your breakfast in the lodge.
  • It is customary to pre-order your meals ahead of time, so they can get organised. below is the standard menu along the trail.
  1. Food is basic.
  2. It is not advisable to eat meat along the trail or in Kathmandu.
A lodge in Phakding Nepal
Lodges usually sell some basics 

Trek with a company or independently but trek with a guide or a porter guide

The Porter guide and me Above Macchermo on the way to Gokyo
Dilip our Porter guide with me above Macchermo on the way to Gokyo

Planning – Decisions before you leave for the Everest Region

  • Who you are going to go with?
    • Decide carefully who you want to go on this trekking adventure with. Because it might not be their dream destination, or cup of tea. I know. Because that was me. But, now I have just returned from my third trek in the Everest Base camp region. And planning a fourth. Trekking in Everest Base Camp region is addictive.
    • If your planned travelling companion is very particular about accommodation – maybe you can go with someone else OR they just give it a go. It’s worth it for the spectacle views … 
Spectacular View from Dingboche Ridgetop
Imja Chola River from above Dingboche

When You Can Trek To Everest Base Camp 

Why are you going ?

  •  If you want to go all the way to Everest Base Camp make sure you have an itinerary no less than 14 days Lukla to Lukla NOT including arrival in Kathmandu.
  • Importantly there is a chance you won’t get to Base Camp. On our first trek in 2013 we didn’t, and you need to be prepared for that. Pushing on could cost you your life. You can always try again another time. There is no shame in not getting to EBC.
  • You might be happy enough just to experience trekking and the big mountain panoramic views. Then maybe trekking to Namche Bazaar is far enough. Or you could go a bit farther to Thame or Khumjung. It is still a fantastic experience with great views. Dingboche is further with fantastic massive landscape views.

The Number of Days Trekking to Everest Base Camp is the Most Important Factor to Get to Base Camp Safely 

Your Trekking Options. How Will You Trek ?  

  • with a tour group, or independently with a guide and porter or a porter guide?
  • will you book before you leave home or in Kathmandu?

Research, Book, Buy and Train, Train, Train

Know What to Expect  – Mental Preparation is Everything 

  • We researched our gear by going to all the trekking shops and buying in store.
  • Buy gear early unless you want to buy it in Kathmandu, which I don’t recommend.
    • Buy your boots early. You need to wear them in. 
    • Start shopping for your best airfare options – we buy our air tickets only few months before our departure – just in case circumstances change
    • Research insurance, costs of a porter etc
  • Read some blog posts and get an idea on what to expect
    • Read about
      • the accommodation
      • the food
      • what the trail is like
      • look at some maps on the internet
      • look at Google Earth along the track
      • buy or borrow a range of guide books
      • watch some YouTube videos
    • It is important one person going knows what to expect each day. If you have a guide, they will tell you each night what to expect the next day. A porter/ guide, may not speak English as well as a guide, but they will be able to tell you on how long it will take you to get to your next destination and a rough description of the trail. Even with the porters and guides it is a good idea to know what you are signing up for before you book your trek and airfares. Do your research before you book anything.  
  • Train with your trekking clothes and your day pack and some weight. Try a drink bottle with an increasing amount of water to increase the weight slowly.
  • Train, train and train   

Best Months to Trek in the Mount Everest Base Camp Region?

The best times to trek and the seasons in the Everest Base Camp region

  • April, May – when all the rhododendrons are flowering, the warmer of the two seasons and the busiest because the Mount Everest climbing season is in May. A lot of people and food and equipment move along the track in April.
  • October to December – a colder but less busy season. There is chance of clouds in the afternoon and of some snow in higher parts
    • We have only trekked in this season. It was quiet for us because there were no flights for about three or four days.

Months to Avoid Everest Base Camp Trekking

  • January and February is winter and cold. A few people do trek then. But why would you?
  • August and September are the monsoon season. Lots of rain and clouds can obscure the views and there is the possibility of landslides lower part of the track.
September 2015 between Mongla and Portse Tenga Nepal
You can be unlucky with the weather …

After You Decide to Trek to EBC Region – Research Some More

  • Research your trek – the destination and the route
    • Build flexibility into your itinerary.
  • A great tip is to plan 2 to 4 buffer days. A tight deadline is not what you want. You might get sick, or feel unwell or miss a flight in or out.

https://bearfoottheory.com/planning-your-everest-base-camp-trek-logistics/

  • Begin your training 3 to 6 months before you go depending on your fitness level
    • 3 months if you are reasonably fit and need targeted training
    • 6 months if you want to establish general fitness first

Research and Preparation Equal Success for the Everest Base Camp Region treks

 

We Are Off for Trek Number 3 in Nepal

We’re off to Trek in Nepal. Again.

Above Dingboche Everest Base Camp trek

Above Dingboche Everest Base Camp trek

Yes, I am in love. In love with the Nepalese landscapes and with the simplicity of the trekking in Nepal. A colleague asked me what’s the attraction, she knows it is my third trek.

Why Go to Trek In Nepal?

If you ask The Trainer (aka my husband) he’d say he’s doing it to keep me fit! In fact, the need to keep up a general level of fitness and then to train four times a week for two or three months before we leave for Nepal, is a big side benefit. But I really liked the feeling of achievement after taking on the challenge of trekking to Everest Base Camp. And feeling so incredibly fit from the simple days, sustained walking, fresh air and fresh food walking through magnificent landscapes. It felt amazing. And I was glowing when I returned home.

Good Planning is Important for a Successful Trek

Signage in the Khumbu

Although we have to the Everest Base Camp region twice before or maybe, because we have been before, I am conscious to not become blasé about what we are about to do.

  1. We have kept up the training.
  2. We (that would be the Trainer) have researched the route and itinerary options
  3. We are reviewing what we are taking. I have bought a new Osprey day back pack.
  4. We are reviewing the packing list
  5. We reviewed the drug list – the Trainer bought out the chemist
  6. We checked in with our contact in Kathmandu that everything is on track with flights to Lukla, organising our Porter and getting our TIMS Card
  7. We have booked our hotel in Kathmandu

So, we fly to Nepal in two weeks. I am very excited to be staying at the Kathmandu Guest House when we arrive and when we leave. If it is good enough for Ricky Martin, it’s good enough for us too.

We are trekking independently again but will be taking a porter/ guide, like on our second trek.

Trekking to Gokyo Ri and the Gokyo Lakes

We are going back to the Khumbu, the Everest Base Camp region but we are trekking to Gokyo. The trek is marketed as Gokyo and the Glacial lakes. If you read the trekking tour blurbs this is what they list as the highlights.

  • Stand at the shores of a chain of six turquoise, glacial-fed lakes
  • Hike along Ngozumpa Glacier, the largest glacier in the Himalaya
  • Avoid the Everest crowds, but enjoy the selection of great views
  • Climb Gokyo Ri (5,357 m) for spectacular views of Everest, Lhotse, and Cho Oyu
  • Trek through the Sherpa town of Khumjung, home of a ‘real’ yeti skull
  • From ‘Scoundrel’s viewpoint’ near the fifth lake, peer over the vast Ngozumpa Glacier a wasteland of rock and ice

Khumjung Everest Base Camp trek September 2015

Walking into Khumjung

In fact the view from Gokyo Ri is meant to be better than the view from Kala Pattar on the Base Camp trek. Also, weather permitting, we will be crossing over Cho La Pass. We haven’t done that before. Climbed a pass. This will be a hard a long day. Easily the hardest.  But we will only go if the weather is good otherwise it can be treacherous. We have a day and a buffer day at Gokyo to help with this. We have been told that the walk to Fifth Lake is well worth while.

And in true Nervous Nelly style I am anxious about it. Again. This time I am anxious about the pass. However, the Trainer is talking me up. Cho La Lou he is calling me. Cho La Lou, Queen of the High Passes. Sort of has a nice ring to it doesn’t it ?

Everest Base Camp trek

 

Any advice on the Cho La Pass an Gokyo, comments are very welcome.

Nepal Captures Your Heart Forever

Himalayan Landscapes Are Forever in Your Heart

I have become addicted to wanting to walk in these landscapes. Forever.

Main Everest Base Camp Trail

Well at least one more time. But then I know it will be one more time. Again.

That’s me on Day 13 of our Mount Everest Base Camp trek returning to Lukla. From the top of Kala Pattar we had the closest view of Everest, two weeks before I turned 58. That was October 2015. Now, we just have to go again. Back to see, and be a part, of these massive landscapes.

Flying to Lukla

All my reservations  left me when I saw the first vista from the plane flying to Lukla.  And my eyes filled with tears. In 2013 it was the first time I had ever done anything like this – hike or trek. Me, walk all the way to my next destination? Never.

EBC Trek Day 2

On the lower part of the trek the vistas are smaller. Remember it’s all relative. The noisy river, the trees, the small villages along the trail. And the bridges which cross back and forth over the river. The blue roofs are at Benkar and our porter is a little up ahead with the orange pack.

Then there is the iconic bridge which features in in the movie Everest. After crossing the suspension bridge and the fast moving Dudh Kosi river below there is the steep big climb to Namche Bazaar.Bridges across to Nacmhe Bazaar hill

Day 4 Above Namche Bazaar heading towards TengbocheIn the photo above look closely at the bottom point of the river to see the two bridges. Looking back at different points and seeing how far you have come gives you a great sense of achievement. It’s all part of the addiction. Lodges in Nepal

There can be amazing views even from your room. The climb to Namche Bazaar is worth the view. You can even climb higher, pay more and stay at the Everest View Hotel and get a view of Everest.  Above Namche Bazaar on Acclimatisation Day

I love the view of the two rivers below. The two bridges in the photos above cross where the two rivers meet. The day before I had walked alongside the river. There was a bit of cloud and rain as it was the very end of September. But we didn’t get wet.

Namche Bazaar to Tengboche EBC Trek

When we flew to Lukla the first time there was an man sitting next my husband who was on his seventeenth trek to Nepal. I told you it was addictive. He pointed out the mountains by name. I want to be able to recognise all the mountains and name them too. The one above is Ama Dablam, she is distinctive and easy to spot.

EBC Trek Walking to Dingboche

Above the tree line and blue skies. The track levels out in places.

Day 7 EBC Trek to DingbocheLittle hamlets and big views. Part of the attraction is no crowds. I loved Dingboche and the acclimatisation day walk above it. Half way up the hill you can see the C-shaped track above the stupa and to the right. That’s about 400 metres above the town and where the flag pole below was. The views were stupendous. I loved it.

View of mountains above the small village of Dingboche on the EBC Trek

There are walks to be taken from Dingboche so I just have to go back…

EBC Trek Dingboche to Lobuche

EBC Trek Dingboche to Lobuche

The massive landscapes put things in perspective.

Above Pheriche, Everest Base Camp trek

You could look at the view forever but you have to move on to the next amazing vista.

EBC Trek near Gorak Shep

And the views feel so special because you have “worked” and walked to get there. Note the people in the bottom left hand corner.

Gorak Shep and Kala Patthar

And when you get to your final destination and climb that final brown hill and stand in front of Everest and above Everest Base Camp…

On top of Kala Patthar in October

you understand it’s not just about getting there. The whole journey and the effort to get there is special. But be warned. It’s addictive.

Everest Base Camp in the morning

A morning view from Mount Everest Base Camp.

Posted on February 1, 2018 by Louise Terranova

Train For Hills and Steps on the EBC Trek

How You Should Train To Enjoy The EBC Trek

There Are Lots of Steps on the EBC Trek So Do Step Training

Namche to Tengboche
Continue reading

The EBC Trek Trail in 20 Photos

How Difficult is the EBC Trek ? Here it is in photos.

Part of the answer to how difficult the EBC trek is, is about what you are walking on. This shows why you need to do step training. And hill training of course.

Main Street Lukla, setting out on Main Trail EBC Trek

Cobblestones in Lukla, there are flat parts through villages in the lower part of the trail.

EBC Trek Before Phakding after Ghat
When down hill is uphill too. And lots of steps.

EBC Trek Between Phakding and Monjo
Watch your step.

Lower suspension bridge over the Dudh Khosi taken from the higher bridge
One of the Bridges at Namche Bazaar.

EBC Trek Above Namche Bazaar
Rocks and rocky paths.

EBC Trek Coming Into Khumjung
Smooth path into Khumjung after a big climb.

EBC Trek Above Upper Phakding
Windy paths along the side of mountains,

EBC Trek Heading Towards Dingboche
The hills look innocent enough here but the altitude is increasing.

EBC Trek Towards Dingboche
Paths widen over turf

Bridge at the confluence of Khumbu Khola and the Imja Khola Nepal
and over rivers

EBC Trek Heading towards Dingboche
Flat but at altitude don’t rush.

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla
Across turf at 4,000 metres

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla above Periche
From Dingboche to Dughla above Periche

EBC Trek To Gorak Shep
To Gorak Shep an amazing part of the trail. Lots of rocks to pick your way over.

EBC Trek near Gorak Shep
The path from above…

EBC Trek The climb up to Kala Patthar
The hardest walk to Kala Patthar. Over 5,500 metres.

EBC Trek almost to Base Camp
Walking the last few kilometres to Base Camp.

Everest Base Bamp Trek
There are hills to go up as you go back down to Lukla. These are marathon runners.

Coming down from Tengboche EBC Trek
Coming back down can be slippery with those little loose rocks.

EBC Trek Looking back towards Periche
There are still hills coming down and the magnificent views in reverse.

The thing to understand about these photos is on the really big climb days to Namche Bazaar and to Tengboche – you are too exhausted to take photos. And the photos don’t really show the steepness of the climb.

Lukla-EBC-KP-Gorakshep_Elevation Profile
Here is a elevation profile I found. The triangular peak represents the acclimatisation day walk above Dingboche.

Day Eight Dingboche Acclimatisation Day 2015 Trek

Dingboche My Favourite Day

Tenzing Got There First

Our Acclimatization Day in Dingboche

Yes thank you to our Porter .. Basanta he was lovely… for always watching out for me.

I loved , loved, loved this day and Dingboche. I could go back to this part of the world every year.

Ok there is a fuzzy bit in the video but – who cares….

Who is coming next time we trek here ?

Don’t forget to check out my Home Page Our Itinerary for our Everest Base Camps Treks

Kathmandu Street Scenes

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Kathmandu Shops and Signs

Thamel in Kathmandu is a bit like the scene in Alice in Wonderland where there are signs everywhere and you still don’t know where to go.  A present for Mark from This Amazing Planet

thamel-street-2Thamel Street Kathmandu

We were told all the wires were internet cables not electricity.

 

 

Beautiful One Day Breathtaking the Next

A Photo is Worth a Thousand Superlatives

Above Pheriche, EBC Trek, Nepal

From the moment you walk out of Lukla to trek to Everest Base Camp the views are beautiful. The higher you go the more amazing the views, higher again the views become breathtaking panoramas. Continue reading

Things You Should Know about Trekking to Everest Base Camp

Things you might not know about Kathmandu, trekking to EBC and Nepal in general.

If someone says that they are trekking to Everest Base Camp it doesn’t mean they have to sleep in a tent or are intending to climb Mount Everest.

Tents of the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp
Tents of the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp

Accommodation is simple on the trail there is not a lot of up market accommodation.

There are no roads into Lukla the start of the Everest Base Camp Trek. Generally  people fly into Lukla and start trekking from there. The nearest road is at Jiri and you can walk from there. The airport was built in 1964. People still walk in from Jiri. Jennifer from Jennifer’s Journeys did it.

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Some villages along the track have wifi but it doesn’t always work. Great places for wifi are Namche Bazaar, Dingboche and maybe Pangboche and Lobuche. It is a combination of the location but also the lodge.

The early part of the trail is not that remote and you will see children going to school along the trail.

Children running home from school EBC trek trail Nepal

You need to research the season and the months you are traveling well. There advantages for the different seasons.

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December – cold but beautiful dry sunny days

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Late September two years later. Warmer days when the cloud lifts.

Going there you are helping the local economy.

Stick to vegetables on the trail. Refrigeration is not brilliant.

Neplese food on the EBC trek

It is not normal walking and Diamox is key. Make sure you have it an I would tend to follow the trekking guides’ recommendation, as in experienced guides who lead treks on a regular basis. A slow trek is key to getting there without be sick. Altitude headaches can be really horrible. I’ve heard and read. We didn’t have any.

There is a thing called a Go Girl. Apparently female rock climbers use them to urinate. Practice is advised.

Kathmandu has lots of places to see including Durbar Square where you can see lots of pigeons.

Durbar Square and pigeons Kathmandu

Having a massage after a trek is a very good idea. I didn’t do this and I felt really sore and stiff a few weeks later, back home in Australia. I felt like my body was seizing up. Next time I will have a massage.

The lower part of Nepal is quite tropical almost and you can even go on a jungle safari. We went to Chitwan. Buses are very scary and the journeys are incredibly slow.

You can fly into Lukla for a day and take flights up over Everest.

You don’t have to go to EBC you can take a shorter trek and just go as far as Tengboche. There are other side treks you could go and not go to EBC.

Step Training? Affirmative

Three Months Until Your EBC Trek? Get Training

Do I need to include steps in my training ? You bet. By the end of your training you should be able to do 1 hour of steps with a ten minute break in the middle.

Main Everest Base Camp Trail between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche treacherous steps but a great view.

There’s the man with the vision and the all the plans. Trek to Everest Base Camp, Nepal. He had been to trek the Annapurna circuit in the 80s and he knew there is a lot of uneven ground so he insisted on finding uneven hills to train on and lots of stairs too.

And stairs were in abundance …..

Between Lukla and Phakding
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Monastery or Gompa at Khumjung Nepal

Om Mane Padme Hum

Khumjung Monastery
Khumjung Monastery Khumjung Nepal
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Gompa at Khumjung
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Khumjung Monastery

The colour on the inside of the monastery was a welcome warmth from the cloud that had descended on the town for most of the day. The monastery is the red building you can see on the right.

This monastery has the famous yeti skull. I don’t think it is right for me to have a photo of it here. You will have to go and see for yourself and pay a donation for the privilege.

Photos taken 25 September 2015. The weather can be cloudy at the end of September.  Also posts on the same day

All Things Yak on the EBC Track

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Meeting Yaks on the Track

On the Everest Base Camp trek you might see mountain goats, magnificent eagles and other beautiful birds but the yaks were my favourite along the trail.

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Simple Not Basic on the EBC Trail

A Post about Food on the EBC Trek Becomes More. Or Is it Less?

There is a difference between basic and simple. Especially when you are traveling.

Gorak Shep and Kala Patthar

Recently I posted about accommodation on the EBC trek being basic. A comment from a fellow blogger (thanks Miriam) made me rethink how I had labelled  the accommodation. It is the very fact the Everest Base Camp Trek is basic, makes it so good. Basic can be seen as a negative.  So simple, not basic, is a better word to use. Because it is the simplicity of the EBC trek that makes it so special.

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Accommodation and Food on The EBC Trek

Eat, Heat, Recharge and Sleep on the Everest Base Camp Trail

Main trail Lukla to Kala Patthar at Phakding

The Shangrilla Lodge in Phakding in 2015. We stayed here on the first night and the second last nights of Everest Base Camp trek.

Our First Lodge Experience

I remembered the lodge pictured above from our first 2013 trek. We didn’t stay there then. Our flight from Kathmandu to Lukla was delayed about four hours due to fog. We were trekking solo, without a guide or porter and had no accommodation booked.

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Stupa at Khumjung

Two photos of a Stupa in Khumjung taken from different directions and two years apart. Photos taken in December 2013 taken end of September 2015, two earthquakes later.

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There is a beautiful mani wall along the walk in from Namche Bazaar.

Stupa at Khumjung in the Khumbu region of Nepal

I assume the cracks are from the second earthquake on May 12 2015. The small boy in the photo has his back pack on and had just come out from the Edmund Hillary School, the biggest school in the Khumjung.

April 25 earthquake magnitude 7.8

May 12 earthquake magnitude 7.3

Two Earthquakes and Two Films – another of my posts

Worth a look earthquake 2015 – Great Himalyas Trail website