Day Seven Shomare to Dingboche

Day Seven – Shomare to Dingboche Monday 28 September 2015

Yaks coming back from the Base Camp.
Yaks on the way to Dingboche. I loved the lime green leaves that provided a flash of light contrasting with the dark green heath type plants featured in this landscape.

Three hours walking today.

The yaks that arrived after dark the night before at our lodge were brought down from the hill early in the morning. They were loaded up on the lawn in front of the lodge. A vet (well possibly not a vet as such) came to attend to one of the yaks so we witnessed the ointment and injection procedure while we waited for our breakfast.

Which reminds me it usually is a good idea to order your breakfast the night before and your dinner a bit beforehand to give the person cooking time to get organised.

We said goodbye to Ngima (means Sunday) and her husband Lhakpa (means Wednesday) from the lodge. Sherpa people’s first name is always the day of week. This can be confusing. Ngima and Lhakpa spent some time explaining this the night before.

After a steep ascent out of Shomare  it was a lovely walk over heavily rutted but flat grassy tracts of land. We passed lots of yak pastures and a woman gathering dung for fuel. We didn’t know it at the time but India had put an embargo on goods going into Nepal. Nepal’s gas comes from India which meant no gas was coming in either. This may have accounted for the lack of  donkey trains as they carry the gas up the mountains.

I met two people coming back from Everest Base Camp who really raved about it. The actual Base Camp has the reputation for not being very picturesque and really the view from Kala Patthar is the highlight of the Everest Base Camp Trek. One woman suggested we go to EBC in the morning rather than the afternoon, which we did.

Talking to a trekker coming back from Base Camp.
Hearing about the trail people’s experience of Base Camp and the weather was always good. Our porter waiting patiently for me.
Above the yak pastures on the trail to Dingboche.
One of favourite days walking into Dingboche past yak pastures.

Had a great warm shower in a spacious shower room outside. It was our first opportunity to wash clothes and have them dry on the following acclimatisation day.

The Trainer met the team of marathon runners (field of 30) who were walking to Everest Base Camp to run the Everest Base Camp to Namche Bazaar Marathon. It was rescheduled after the earthquake from May until the end of September. The Trainer knew about this because of his research and was excited to finally get a chance to meet and talk to them.

Dingboche was a big surprise because I hadn’t seen many good photos of the town. It was magic walking in along the valley being totally surrounded by massive mountains. The Trainer was also taken with Dingboche and after the trek we both agreed it was one our favourite spots. It would be a great finishing spot if someone trekking didn’t want to go all the way to EBC. There are lots of walks to do from here apart from the standard walk above the village above the stupa.

Walking into Dingboche with the river below.
Almost there – walking into Dingboche

At this altitude an Everest Base Camp Trek would have an acclimatisation day and it would either be in Dingboche or in Periche depending on which way you walked in.

As it is a village people stay two nights there are a few WiFi cafes and I had the best chocolate croissant fresh out of the oven.

Other day treks off the Main Everest Base Camp Trail from Dingboche would include a hike to Chukhung up the Imja Chola Valley. The guide books say that is a three to four hour trek. This hike goes through Bibre.

Day Six Phortse to Shomare

Everest Base Camp Trek

Heads in the Clouds

Clouds blocking a great view

Sitting in cloud hoping it would lift

We walked up out of Phortse and then up forever. At the top it was very cloudy (dherai mukpa) which was disappointing as the views would have been spectacular but because we were trekking at the very end of the monsoon season there were still clouds around and we could not see a thing.

At Pangboche and went inside the monastery or gompa here while our lunch was being cooked. It is the oldest monastery in the Khumbu.

We came in and walked out of Pangboche a totally different way from our 2013 trek. Our impression walking in was of quite a different village. The walk out past the helicopter rescue pad and lots of chortens and mani stones was interesting and the cloud broke and we had some sneak mountain views at last.  Continue reading

Shomare Nepal

Shomare 4040 metres

This is the photo of the last place we reached before we turned around from our trek to Everest Base Camp in 2013. A small “restaurant” on what you would call the outskirts of town. We had a coffee and made a joint decision to turn back. It seemed the right thing to do considering the rash creeping up both my legs.

Ever since reaching Everest Base Camp has felt like unfinished business. We had done a couple of the really hard days and we only had another 23.7 kilometres to get to Everest Base Camp and Kala Pattar. Certainly it was such a fantastic experience we wanted to do it again.

Everest Base Camp Trek

Somare. Our last stop before turning back