Naming Mountains Above Dingboche

Video

The Video

One reason why you should take a guide or porter guide with you…

…they teach you all the names of mountains ! But there are lots more reasons…

See the post about The Porter

Ama Dablam

Everest Base Camp Trek Titbit

On our first flight to Lukla a European man in his seventies was sitting across the aisle from my husband. As we flew along the magnificent Himalayas mountain range  he pointed out the names of the various mountains to Sam. I was impressed. This guy knew his mountains. Obviously it wasn’t his first trip. Warning: trekking in Nepal is addictive.

I wanted to be able to list off the mountains too, so before our 2015 trek I studied up on them, well the pictures at least. (Back home I’m still working on that). Apart from Mount Everest which is not that easy to spot because it hides a lot until the very end of the trek, Ama Dablam is one of the first mountains you will come to know and recognise wherever you are. The mountains change shape as you move along the trail because your view changes. Ama Dablam is different it has that funny skinny cone shape and later it has an armchair shape. Remember you’ve got to use your imagination a bit.

Ama Dablam is first visible after Namche Bazaar and there is good view of from Khumjung, which is above Namche Bazaar. In fact the guide books tells you Ama Dablam towers above Khumjung. And she does. Are mountains referred to as male of female? Well I’m calling Ama Dablam a she as it means Mother’s Chest  or Mother’s Treasure Chest or a jewel box if you like. And by all accounts she deserves some respect.

Here she is.

Ama Dablam from the Everest Base trek

Ama Dablam photo taken between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche

 

Up for another Everest Base Camp Trek Titbit?

Bridge Too Many or Bridge Love – bridges on the way to Base Camp and some photos

Gorak Shep Next Stop EBC

What does it mean to trek to Everest Base Camp? Do you actually stay there? Not unless you want to sleep in a tent on very cold rocky ground and climb Mount Everest. Which incidentally is barely visible from Everest Base Camp (5300m).

The best place to see Everest from is from Kala Pattar (5545m). How do you get there? From Gorak Shep (5170m), the end of the trail for the average person. Not that you feel very average after walking from eight to eleven days to get there. It feels like walking to the Middle Earth.

Gorak Shep is pretty average when it comes to accommodation. Situated on what was once a lake it has a handful of lodges. But at that stage of the trek you just want a warm bed and a toilet and somewhere to have three meals – lunch, dinner and breakfast usually in that order and to go to what will possibly be the two most special and remote places you will go to in your lifetime. And when you have been there you will want tell the world.

Apart from walking to Base Camp also abbreviated to EBC the best part is the Himalayas spread before you in the most magnificent vista that will be hard to top. You see this from what I discovered was a fairly insignificant looking “hill” of which I had never seen a photo of. So here is one, so you know what you will climb to see that view.

Gorak Shep the end of the Everest Base Camp trek

Walking into Gorak Shep the end of the Everest Base Camp Trek

Looks insignificant in the scheme of things with all the massive mountains around it. Innocent even. But that little brown in the middle ground, Kala Pattar is 5545 metres high. It takes two hours to climb to the top, an elevation of 375m from Gorak Shep  via the trail on the right. The snow covered mountain in the middle is Pumori.

Louise and Sam Terranova were at Everest Base Camp at the very start of the trekking season after the Nepal earthquakes on 2 October 2015. Lodges had been repaired and the Khumbu was ringing with the sound of stonemasons building new lodges and repairing others along the trail.

A note about Pumori the big triangular mountain in the middle, it is off this mountain that the avalanche came as a result of the April 2015 earthquake. It dumped snow at Base Camp.

You can read an account from Svati Narula who was at Base Camp when the quake hit.