The EBC Trek Trail in 20 Photos

How Difficult is the EBC Trek ? Here it is in photos.

Part of the answer to how difficult the trail is about what you are walking on. This shows why you need to do step training. And hill training of course.

Main Street Lukla, setting out on Main Trail EBC Trek

Cobblestones inLukla, there are flat parts through villages in the lower part of the trail.

EBC Trek Before Phakding after Ghat

When down hill is uphill too. And lots of steps.

EBC Trek Between Phakding and Monjo

Watch your step.

Lower suspension bridge over the Dudh Khosi taken from the higher bridge

One of the Bridges at Namche Bazaar.

EBC Trek Above Namche Bazaar

Rocks and rocky paths.

EBC Trek Coming Into Khumjung

Smooth path into Khumjung after a big climb.

EBC Trek Above Upper Phakding

Windy paths along the side of mountains,

 

EBC Trek Heading Towards Dingboche

The hills look innocent enough here but the altitude is increasing.

EBC Trek Towards Dingboche

Paths widen over turf

Bridge at the confluence of Khumbu Khola and the Imja Khola Nepal

and over rivers

EBC Trek Heading towards Dingboche

Flat but at altitude don’t rush.

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla

Across turf at 4,000 metres

EBC Trek Dingboche to Dughla above Periche

From Dingboche to Dughla above Periche

EBC Trek To Gorak Shep

To Gorak Shep an amazing part of the trail.

EBC Trek near Gorak Shep

The path from above…

EBC Trek The climb up to Kala Patthar

The hardest walk to Kala Patthar. Over 5,500 metres.

EBC Trek almost to Base Camp

Walking the last few kilometres to Base Camp.

Everest Base Bamp Trek

There are hills to go up as you go back down to Lukla. These are marathon runners.

Coming down from Tengboche EBC Trek

Coming back down can be slippery with those little loose rocks.

EBC Trek Looking back towards Periche

There are still hills coming down but still the magnificent views in reverse.

The thing to realise about these photos is that the really big climb days to Namche Bazaar and to Tengboche – you are too exhausted to take photos. And  the photos don’t really show the steepness of the climb.

Lukla-EBC-KP-Gorakshep_Elevation Profile

Here is a elevation profile I found. The triangular peak represents the acclimatisation day walk above Dingboche.

 

 

 

Beautiful One Day Breathtaking the Next

A Photo is Worth a Thousand Superlatives

Above Pheriche, EBC Trek, Nepal

From the moment you walk out of Lukla to trek to Everest Base Camp the views are beautiful. The higher you go the more amazing the views, higher again the views become breathtaking panoramas. Looking through the hundreds of photos taken by The Trainer and our two treks through the Khumbu, the beauty is commonplace and you gravitate to the most spectacular photos. It is easy for a good photo to go unnoticed. Like this one.

I found it hiding in among some spectacular shots in my media viewer. When I looked closer I realised it was a great photo that had it all. The long milky river, the panorama of mountains, the track where you walk, the close up of the plus 4,4oo metres ground where I was standing and the settlement of Pheriche below in the distance. This walk on day nine of our trek from Dingboche (4,360 metres) to Dughla (4,600 ) was a relatively easy walk. And we took a side walk off behind Dughla to have a look at the lake.

An here is the view or should I say panorama taken down in the valley just before we walked through Pheriche. Sometimes I still can’t believe that’s me in the red jacket and our porter guide walking alongside. I walked through that magnificent landscape. Spectacular, hey?

Near Pheriche Everest Base Camp Trek

Want to know more about the trek. I have just updated the first day of the trek in 2013. It has a few interesting links added. Everest Base Camp Trek Lukla to Phakding

The Lukla to Kala Pattar Elevation Profile may inspire you increase your step training.

Don’t forget to check out my home page for a overview.

Step Training ? Affirmative.

Three Months Until your EBC Trek? Get Training

So I need to include steps in my training ? You bet. By the end of your training you should be doing 1 hour of steps with and short ten minutes break in the middle.

Main Everest Base Camp Trail between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche treacherous steps but a great view.

There’s the man with the vision and the all the plans. Trek to Everest Base Camp, Nepal. He had been to trek the Annapurna circuit in the 80s and he knew there is a lot of uneven ground so he insisted on finding uneven hills to train on and lots of stairs too.

And stairs there were in abundance …..

Between Lukla and Phakding

Eveerest Base CAmp trek trail

Aproach to bridge at Jorsale

trekking Phakding to Monjo Everest Base Camp Trek September 2015

Between Phakding and Monjo

IMG_1434

Donkeys making their way down these stairs – wait for them to pass.

Everest Base Camp trek

Kids an their way home from school running down the stairs. October 2015

Outside Monjo towards Namche Bazaar

An eighty plus year old woman with 40 kilos plus of cabbages, beating me down these stairs. November 2013

 

Everest Base Bamp Trek

Everest Base Camp Marathon day 2015

 

Base Camp Marathon runners after Tengboche heading to Namche Bazaar. October 2015

So you are planning a trek on the Annapurna circuit or to Everest Base Camp and you will be there in three or months you need to start in earnest on your incline training, or hill training. Find some good hills close to home to start doing walking them twice a week with a more intense session on the weekend.  All you need is one good hill with some uneven ground. Go up the hill turn around and go back up. Turn around and do it again and again. Ad nauseum.

Find Some Stairs to Train on

We did stair training for the last two and half months once a week and twice a week for the last six weeks. We started off at ten or twenty minutes building up to 45 minutes to an hour. Up four flights , down four flights. You get the picture.

EBC Trek

There’s the river between the trees…

 

Namche to Tengboche

Approaching some tricky steps …

 

 

Everest Base Camp Trek

Almost there! The infamous climb to Namche Bazaar almost finished.

 

November 2013

Oh course you will be rewarded by fabulous views at the top … before you go down hill to go up again…

Everest Base Camp Trek Tips

  1. Practice with your boots and all your gear.
  2. Buy trekking poles they will help your knees, especially going down hill. Train with them before you leave for Nepal. I mean for a few months at least. If you not used to them you will really feel the pain.
  3. We recommend taking a porter and or porter guide. The photos of me with the orange pack are our 2013 trek without a porter. The shots with the small purple pack were taken on the 2015 trek when we took a porter guide.
  4. Remember your step training and then you will enjoy your trek.
  5. Go slow. Slowly, slowly. Bistari, bistari. It is not a race.
  6. And remember another reason you train and do all of the above – the elevation see Everest Base Camp Trek Elevation profiles and my comments

 

 

At the Top of Kala Patthar

Video

Reminiscing – the Trip of My Life

IMG_1809The Best Travel Adventure

Trekking to Everest Base Camp

I had travelled through the Sahara and been to Timbuktu, seen Iguazu Falls and Rio and lived in Milan and Buenos Aires and was about to go on the trip of my life but I didn’t know it. I sat on the couch with a small pot of expensive lip moisturiser in my hands, crying. Continue reading

Bucket Lists and Difficult Journeys

Trekking to Everest Base Camp-Are You Up To It?

You’ve read great posts about the Everest Base Camp Trek and want to go but are you ready for it?

You don’t need to be an athlete nor a mountain climber to trek to Everest Base Camp. You don’t have to be seasoned hiker either. For many people who trek to Base Camp it is their first experience of anything like this. I was one of these people.

Everest Base Camp is achievable to the average person. Training before you go is highly recommended. Your training is part of the bigger journey. It certainly was part of mine. The Trainer kept reminding me, you know the quote, the journey is not just about the destination. Oh and the question of age. I’m in my fifties and there were plenty of people older than me on the trail.

Above the yak pastures on the trail to Dingboche.

One of favourite days walking into Dingboche past yak pastures.

If you are healthy, have trained and mentally prepared Everest Base Camp is possible. Continue reading

Slip Sliding Away at Everest Base Camp

The Walk You Have To Do

Day Twelve Gorak Shep (5170m) – Everest Base Camp (5300m) – Lobuche

The walk into Everest Base Camp took me by surprise as I hadn’t read the section in the guide book. The trail isn’t much of a trail, making the walk a little crazy. At the end you just clamber over boulders and slip everywhere. But that’s getting a little ahead.

Almost at Everest Base Camp

Insane trail to Everest Base Camp

The photo shows the middle section of the trail which had lots of boulders and scree. A defined path becomes non existent, so we headed in a general direction picking our way as best we could. And following our trusty Porter Guide, of course. As a result of clambering over boulders, I developed blisters on my toes. Applying bandaids before setting out is probably a good idea.

EBC has the reputation of lookng very dull. Most trekkers visit it in the afternoon when the mountains can shade the area. We took the advice to visit in the morning and with the light it was quite lovely.

Exploring Everest Base Camp

Large boulder perched on ice above a small stream

Exploring the Everest Base Camp Area

Exploring the Everest Base Camp area

Everest Base Camp Area

Our Porter Guide Basanta exploring

Tents of the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp

Tents for the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp

I plan to write a post about the runners and the marathon as they were a feature of our trek. We bumped into them several times along the trail much to the Trainer’s delight.

The Main Everest Base Camp Trail’s highlight is the view of Mt. Everest and the Himalaya Range from the top of the hill Kala Patthar. Not everyone has heard of Kala Patthar. However Everest Base Camp is famous, so it’s a must do. Or is it? I felt uneasy at Base Camp, being directly underneath where the 2015 avalanche came off  Mt.Pumori into Base Camp (or so I was told). If I go back I would climb Kala Patthar twice, climbing it once in the afternoon  and again the next morning at sunrise.

The triumphant team of three, lined up to take the obligatory photo by the sign and flags.

We Three at EBC

The Trainer, Me and the Porter with the Yellow Wig at Everest Base Camp

At Everest Base Camp

Climb Every Mountain – The Open Door Singer’s sign at EBC

The sign for my choir had its big moment here. 130 people sang Climb Every Mountain to me before I left Melbourne. It was very special.

The round trip to EBC from Gorak Shep is 8km and takes 6.5 hours. Back at Gorak Shep (the end of the trail and starting point for Kala Patthar and EBC) we had lunch at the lodge where we had slept the night  before and left. We headed back down to Lobuche (a 2.5 hours walk) through the long valley that feels like a moonscape. Back in our lodge in Lobuche we ate and went straight to bed. Exhausted but very happy and very pleased with ourselves.

All the training had prepared us well. The trek to Everest Base Camp is more than the walk to that point. It is about the training before hand, getting all the right gear and training with it, the research and preparation and then the trek itself. It is a long journey in many ways, for which you are rewarded in many ways.

Now we just had to get back down to Lukla in one piece.

 

 

Two Hours to Tengboche

Day Five Namche Bazaar to Tengboche

I knew that Day 3 of our itinerary, climbing to Namche Bazaar would be strenuous. We trained well and  though it wasn’t easy we managed the climb well.

When we set out two days later for Tengboche, Sam told me it would be a relatively easy day. That proved far from the case. We had a breather at the top of Namche after a steep climb out of the amphitheatre – shaped town. After a few more challenging hills with spectacular views, the track really leveled out. That bit was the honeymoon period.

The trail then descends 570 metres to the river after crossing this, there is a relentless 750 metres 2-3 hours climb (according to the guide book) to Tengboche. I am sure this section would have taken us much longer.

The funniest bit was the signage. Not far from Namche there was sign “2 hours to Tengboche”. Two hours further along the track there was another sign “2 hours to Tengboche” and then about another two hours further on, you guessed it – “2 hours to Tengboche”. Hence the comment on the video and the post title. At one point we stopped to catch our breath. Another trekker was doing the same with his guide waiting for him. When we asked the guide how much longer to the top, what do you think he replied? I couldn’t believe it.

On that day I learned mental preparation is everything. I had heard it said in relation to physical challenges but didn’t relate to it until then. For our next trek to Everest Base Camp we will be prepared for the two hours to Tengboche. In fact we are changing the itinerary to start the trek from Khunde or Khumjung and not Namche. The other tip is don’t believe the estimated trekking time between the towns and definitely don’t believe the signage.

Two Hours to Tengboche

Video

I knew Day Three of our itinerary, climbing to Namche Bazaar was going to be a strenuous. We trained well for the trek and though it wasn’t easy we took the climb in our stride.

When we set out two days later for Tengboche, the Trainer told me it would be a relatively easy day. That proved far from the case. We had a breather at the top of Namche after a steep climb out of the amphitheatre-shaped town.

Namche Bazaar Everest Base Camp Trek

Namche Bazaar

After a few more challenging hills with spectacular views, the track really levelled out. That bit was the honeymoon period.

The trail then descends 570 metres to the river, after crossing this, there is a relentless 750 metres two to three hours climb (according to the guide book) to Tengboche. I am sure this section took us much longer.

The biggest problem was the signage. Not long out of Namche there was sign which said “2 hours to Tengboche”. Two hours further along the track there was another sign “2 hours to Tengboche” and then about another two hours further on, you guessed it – “2 hours to Tengboche”. Hence the comment on the video and the post title. At one point after the third sign, we stopped to catch our breath. Another trekker was doing the same with his guide waiting for him. When we asked the guide how much longer to the top, what do you think he replied? I couldn’t believe it.

That day I learnt mental preparation is everything. I had heard it said in relation to physical challenges but had never really experienced it. For our next trek to Everest Base Camp we will be prepared for the “two hours to Tengboche”. In fact we are changing the itinerary to start the trek from Khunde or Khumjung and not Namche. The other tip is don’t believe the estimated trekking time between the towns and definitely don’t believe the signage.