Dingboche My Favourite Day

Tenzing Got There First

Our Acclimatization Day in Dingboche

Yes thank you to our Porter .. Basanta he was lovely… for always watching out for me.

I loved , loved, loved this day and Dingboche. I could go back to this part of the world every year.

Ok there is a fuzzy bit in the video but – who cares….

Who is coming next time we trek here ?

Don’t forget to check out my Home Page Our Itinerary for our Everest Base Camps Treks

 

Beautiful One Day Breathtaking the Next

A Photo is Worth a Thousand Superlatives

Above Pheriche, EBC Trek, Nepal

From the moment you walk out of Lukla to trek to Everest Base Camp the views are beautiful. The higher you go the more amazing the views, higher again the views become breathtaking panoramas. Continue reading

Om Mane Padme Hum

Monastery or Gompa at Khumjung Nepal

Khumjung Monastery

Khumjung Monastery Khumjung Nepal

IMG_0446

IMG_0452

Gompa at Khumjung

IMG_0462Khumjung Monastery

The colour on the inside was a welcome warmth from the cloud that had descended on the town for most of the day. The monastery is the red building you can see on the right.

This monastery has the famous yeti skull. I don’t think it is right for me to have a photo of that here. You will have to go and see for yourself and pay a donation for the privilege.

Photos taken 25 September 2015. The weather can be still a bit tricky at the end of September.  Also posts on the same day

 

Washing Day: Behind the Scenes EBC Trek

Image

Paradise Lodge and Washing and Tents drying

Paradise Lodge Lukla and the washing and tents drying

Stupa at Khumjung

Two photos of a Stupa in Khumjung taken from different directions and two years apart. Photos taken in December 2013 taken end of September 2015, two earthquakes later.

DSC07959

There is a beautiful mani wall along the walk in from Namche Bazaar.

Stupa at Khumjung in the Khumbu region of Nepal

I assume the cracks are from the second earthquake on May 12 2015. The small boy in the photo has his back pack on and had just come out from the Edmund Hillary School, the biggest school in the Khumjum.

April 25 earthquake magnitude 7.8

May 12 earthquake magnitude 7.3

Two Earthquakes and Two Films – another of my posts

Worth a look earthquake 2015 – Great Himalyas Trail website

Drying Hair and Potatoes in the Khumbu: Behind the Scenes EBC Trek

Image

Drying potatoes in the sun in Pangboche Nepal

Pangboche, Everest Base Camp Trail, December 2013

Wordless Wednesday

Earth, Dingboche Ridge-top, Nepal

Image

A Favourite Day on the Everest Base Camp Trek

Dingboche Ridge-top Everest Base Camp Trek

To celebrate Earth Day April 22

Read about our Acclimatisation Walk to Dingboche Ridge-top probably one of my favourite days on our trek.

Or the walk into Dingboche or the walk out to Lobuche.

Daily Post: Earth Photo Challenge

Weather Forecast at EBC

Believe It or Not

It’s true there is weather station on the Everest Base Camp Trek Trail

Everest Base Camp Trail Weather Pyramid

Italian Weather Pyramid out of Lobuche in the direction of Gorak Shep

The Weather Cam at Everest Base Camp or thereabouts. The Trainer walked there by himself. I decided to stay in the lodge and rest up for the next to big days. Built by the Italians he joked he was in search of a short black coffee …

Dingboche Door Framed View

Lodge in dingboche Everest Base Camp trek

Our lodge in Dingboche

Climbing to Namche Bazaar

Day Two Phakding to Monjo 2013  and Phakding to Namche Bazaar 2015

IMG_0242

Above is the suspension bridge at Upper Phakding. We stayed at the lodge just above the end of the bridge in the photo on the way back down from our 2013 trek. The bridge on the Everest Base Camp Trek Blog and  my donkey video.

PLANNING THE TREK BY THE SEASONS

When planning our trek for late September we expected some rain. Continue reading

At the Top of Kala Patthar

Video

I made it. I climbed to Kala Patthar the highlight of the Everest Base Camp trek. The video of me reaching the top, breathless and exhausted.

What, No Mirror ?

IMG_1056

Yes I agree this is not a brilliant photo. But it is the only one from our Everest Base Camp trek with a reflection. Our, being me and The Trainer. And there were no mirrors either and I could have done with one of those.

Photos of reflections in water are rare on the EBC trek . The rivers are running too fast Continue reading

Keeping Watch in Khumjung

Stupa at Khumjung in the Khumbu region of Nepal

Eyes peeping out from the yellow fringe seem sad against the grey cloudy backdrop. Despite being badly cracked from the 2015 earthquake, the stupa still stands sentinel at the end of the main path into Khumjung and watching over the Sir Edmund Hillary School.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/eyes/

Our Porter Guide

He met us at the baggage collection at Lukla airport. After a cup of tea and sorting our packs at the Paradise Lodge we were ready. He tied our bags together with his ropes, positioned the load on his head and led us out of Lukla, stopping every now and then to check we were following.

Consulting the map

Consulting the map

At first from his lack of response to our questions and attempts at conversation I thought he had limited English. But as he tuned in to our accents and we started to get to know each other, he spoke more.

On the second day he seemed a bit more relaxed and he started to teach us some Nepalese words. Jum jum, let’s go and appropriately on the hard climb to Namche Bazaar bistari bistari, slowly slowly. Jokingly he taught us quickly quickly. When we climbed to Khumjung the thick cloud forced my focus to my feet and the spider webs covered in dewdrops, he told me the words for spider and spider webs too.

Alpine flower Solukhumbu
Dew on spider webs

Familiar with the trail, he pointed out things I would never have seen without him. He pointed out birds and bee hives hanging in the crevices of rocks on the other side of the river. Sometimes he sang his Nepali songs. We watched fascinated by his animated conversations with others along the track and picked up his sense of humour and friendly nature.

At the end of the day when I wrote in my small diary, he reminded me of the things we had seen on the trail. He spelt out the Nepalese words I had learnt during the day and I helped him with some new English words in our guide books.

In Dingboche, surrounded by magnificent mountains he taught me their names. He helped while I practiced naming them in order, like a child reciting their abc, learning the Himalayan range spread before me.

Many times we waited together for donkeys and yaks to pass. Once I was caught in a tight spot and I turned away when I shouldn’t have. Fortunately Basanta was watching. I turned around in time to see him pushing a donkey away from me. If he hadn’t of done this the donkey’s side load would have pushed me over the small wall.

He pulled me up the huge black boulders to reach the top of Kala Pattar. Took photos of us together and celebrated with us at Everest Base Camp.

At Everest Base Camp

He called me Louise, sometimes jokingly Mom and sometimes Didi – Big Sister.

Sometimes he led. Sometimes he followed. And sometimes we walked side by side.

Khumjung Village Everest Base Camp TrekSometimes he lead
Porters climbing up to the bridge to Namche Bazaarsometimes he followed
Dingboche to Dughla Everest Base Camp Trekand sometimes we walked side by side

On the last day, walking back to Lukla a woman coming the other way silently pointed at the porter right behind me as if she thought I needed to move aside and let him pass. Yes I know, I thought, he is my porter and he has been close by for sixteen days. He has carried our load making our trek to Base Camp easier. He guided, pointed things out and watched out for us. He was our companion, Nepalese friend and shared his country with us. Thank you Basanta.

 

The porter guide and me
Saying goodbye at the Paradise Lodge in Lukla

 

 

Travel Makes Us Modest

Image

Travel makes us modest,
you see what a tiny place
you occupy in the world.

Gustave Flaubert

Acclimatisation Walk on Dingboche Ridgetop

Acclimatisation Walk on Dingboche Ridge-Top

I could not agree more Gustave.

Leaving Lukla

Everest Base Camp Trek

Day Seventeen Lukla to Kathmandu

The final day of seventeen wonderful days trekking from Lukla to Everest Base Camp and back in October 2015. Having fare-welled our Porter Guide, my husband “the Trainer” and I flew to Kathmandu grateful for completing the trek safely and already thinking of a return trek.

Lukla Airport

Above: The tarmac at Lukla airport and the parking spaces for the four planes that fly back and forward to Lukla every day.

We were up early for one of the first flights out. The Paradise Lodge where we stayed the night is a one-minute walk to the airport. The owner of the lodge said goodbye to us and presented us with the traditional cream scarf to wish us well.

Lukla with the mountain behind
The larger yellow building in the middle is the control tower at Lukla Airport

The departure hall at the airport is a bit crazy and we were glad to have someone with us to direct us where to go and in which order. We very quickly passed through the tickets and security checks and into the hall to wait boarding where passengers are always keen to watch the planes landing. The unloading of passengers and baggage is amazingly quick and the same goes for loading and boarding.

Being our fourth flight, we were relaxed. I was more relaxed about take-off rather landing at Lukla.

As we flew back along the line of the Himalayas I wondered if it would be our last trip as I was hooked on this magnificent part of the world.

Other Posts

The Infamous Lukla Airport 

Missed the beginning of the 2015 trek? Here are the first five days to get you started.

Day 1 2015 Trek – Lukla to Phakding

Day 2 2015 Trek – Phakding to Namche Bazaar

Day 3 2015 Trek – Acclimatisation In Namche Bazaar

Day 4 2015 Trek – Namche Bazaar to Khumjung

Day 5 2015 Trek – Khumjung to Phortse

and here is the 2015 Trek Itinerary with links

Save

Save

One Trek and One Marathon

Everest Base Camp Trek

Day Fourteen Pangboche to Namche Bazaar

The trainer was very excited about finally seeing the marathon runners who had started early that morning from Everest Base Camp running past, all of us on our way to Namche Bazaar. The event was originally in May but was rescheduled to the beginning of October after the earthquakes.

We left our lodge at Pangboche as doctors prepared the medical check point and lodge staff the water bottles.

View of Tengboche in the Middle Distance

IMG_1207

The Temple Gate in Tengboche (Thyanboche)

IMG_1216

A half marathon runner who started at Dingboche at the Tengboche check point

IMG_1212

The following photos show the track. The steep uphill climb (600m) had nearly killed me on our 2013 trek.  Coming back down isn’t easy either.  It can impact on your knees which is why I chose to use trekking poles. The steep track with lots of small loose rocks can be slippery so the only way to go is slowly.

IMG_1231

That’s me picking my way down with the trekking poles.

IMG_1239

Runners taking their time

IMG_1253

The trail from a distance… crazy

IMG_1254

Sanasa with women selling jewellery

IMG_1255

The Finishing Point at Namche Bazaar

IMG_1270

Namche Bazaar from Above

IMG_1272

The view of Namche Bazaar from above. I had my sights set on the red roofed lodge in the middle, right …. which for me meant our favourite lodge, our own bathroom and a hot shower at last.

IMG_1278

Cafe Danphe Bar named after the National Bird of Nepal

IMG_1293

We had a drink at Café Danphe Bar to celebrate our successful, wonderful trek to Everest Base Camp. Huddled together in the bar we looked at all the photos Sam had taken.  For the best of an hour I sat with tears streaming down my face, hardly able to believe the photos of the magical places we had just been.

Save

Slip Sliding Away at Everest Base Camp

The Walk You Have To Do

Day Twelve Gorak Shep (5170m) – Everest Base Camp (5300m) – Lobuche

The walk into Everest Base Camp took me by surprise as I hadn’t read the section in the guide book. The track isn’t much of a track, making the walk a little crazy. At the end you just clamber over boulders and slip everywhere. But that’s getting a little ahead.

Almost at Everest Base Camp
Insane trail to Everest Base Camp

The photo shows the middle section of the trail which had lots of boulders and scree. A defined path becomes non-existent, so we headed in a general direction picking our way as best we could. And following our trusty Porter Guide, of course. Because of clambering over boulders, I developed blisters on my toes. Applying band aids before setting out is probably a good idea.

EBC has the reputation of looking very dull. Most trekkers visit it in the afternoon when the mountains can shade the area. We took the advice to visit in the morning and with the light it was quite lovely.

Exploring Everest Base Camp
Large boulder perched on ice above a small stream

Exploring the Everest Base Camp Area
Exploring the Everest Base Camp area
Everest Base Camp Area
Our Porter Guide Basanta exploring
Tents of the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp
Tents for the 2015 Ultra Marathon Runners at Everest Base Camp

I plan to write a post about the runners and the marathon as they were a feature of our trek. We bumped into them several times along the trail much to the Trainer’s delight.

The Main Everest Base Camp Trail’s highlight is the view of Mt. Everest and the Himalaya Range from the top of the hill Kala Patthar. Not everyone has heard of Kala Patthar. However, Everest Base Camp is famous, so it’s a must do. Or is it? I felt uneasy at Base Camp, being directly underneath where the 2015 avalanche came off Mt. Pumori into Base Camp (or so I was told). If I go back I would climb Kala Patthar twice, climbing it once in the afternoon and again the next morning at sunrise.

The triumphant team of three, lined up to take the obligatory photo by the sign and flags.

We Three at EBC
The Trainer, Me and the Porter with the Yellow Wig at Everest Base Camp
At Everest Base Camp
Climb Every Mountain – The Open Door Singer’s sign at EBC

The sign for my choir had its big moment here. 130 people sang Climb Every Mountain to me before I left Melbourne. It was very special.

The round trip to EBC from Gorak Shep is 8km and takes 6.5 hours. Back at Gorak Shep (the end of the trail and starting point for Kala Patthar and EBC) we had lunch at the lodge where we had slept the night before and left. We headed back down to Lobuche (a 2.5-hour walk) through the long valley that feels like a moonscape. Back in our lodge in Lobuche we ate and went straight to bed. Exhausted but very happy and very pleased with ourselves.

All the training had prepared us well. The trek to Everest Base Camp is more than the walk to that point. It is about the training before hand, getting all the right gear and training with it, the research and preparation and then the trek itself. It is a long journey in many ways, for which you are rewarded in just as many ways.

Now we just had to get back down to Lukla in one piece.

Everest Above Our Heads and Base Camp at Our Feet

The definitive photo on Kala Patthar
The Trainer and I with Everest above our heads and Base Camp at our feet.

The Million Dollar View from Kala Pattar

And the Trainer’s Last Words

Day Eleven – Lobuche to Gorak Shep and climbing Kala Pattar (5545m)

People who have trekked to Everest Base Camp, or have friends that have, or are busy planning and researching the trek themselves will know the highlight of the trek is not Everest Base Camp but in fact, is climbing to Kala Pattar above Gorak Shep to view Mount Everest from the closest and highest viewpoint on the main EBC Trail. Many climb the hill in the darkness of early morning to see the sun rise on Everest or in the evening to see the sun set. Climbing in the afternoon after first arriving in Gorak Shep and after an early lunch is also an option. But more about the options in another post.

Unlike our first trek in 2013, when we had no porter a notebook would have been considered excess weight.

During our prolonged packing planning phase, every gram was weighed and assessed and rationalised. More on that later too. On our recent trek I did take a small notebook and I kept a very short diary. My last entry to this diary was in fact the previous day (Day Ten Dughla to Lobuche). Why? Because day eleven and the following two days are big days and you are very tired, as a result. I came back down from Kala Pattar, exhausted and was fast asleep at 5:30.

Most treks go from Lobuche to Kala Pattar. You start off early from your lodge and the walk out is quite flat initially, over turf sometimes with very small streams and little puddles of water which reminded me of rock pools. Not far out of Lobuche is the turn off to the Italian Weather Pyramid. Sam had been there the afternoon before to explore and take photos. I had taken the soft option of resting up for the next day.

Part of his research back home in Melbourne had often looked at the weather on the webcam on the pyramid. The closest thing to the Bureau of Meteorology at Base Camp. The building looks spectacular from the photos. And more amazing when you realise what a building like that means in terms of getting the materials there to build it.

There is a very short steep climb not long after setting out but after that, most of the walk is flattish. The trail crosses the moraine of the Changri Glacier. There are mountains on both sides of the long valley and the landscape is stark, stunning and like a moonscape.

Lobuche to Gorak Shep

Eveerest Base Camp Trek Dughla to Lobuche

You move ever closer to the conical peak of Pumori another mountain fairly easy to identify. That’s it, peeking out from the left of the hill in the photo above.

The flattish path is strewn with rocks and often becomes rutted turf. It was relatively easy for us because we were managing the altitude well with half a Diamox tablet taken twice daily. I had started taking them in Dingboche. This was part of the advice we took from Lhakpa from Khumbu Adventures in Kathmandu the day before we flew to Lukla. We had different advice from different sources, different doctors, including some very good advice from a GP in our group of doctors who had been there on several occasions. Firsthand experience is always good but at the end of the day Lhakpa has led many treks to Base Camp and many other mountainous regions so we decided to take his advice which was to take the Diamox at 4,000 metres, regardless of how we were feeling.

Lobuche to Gorak Shep

Lobuche to Gorak Shep
Crossing a stream over the rocky trail to Gorak Shep

The bridge above takes the prize for being the smallest of the many bridges you cross on the trek to Everest Base Camp.

Coming into Gorak Shep with the Mountain Range Above
Coming into Gorak Shep with the path to Kala Patthar above the left of my head.

I felt a huge sense of achievement arriving at Gorak Shep and a great sense of anticipation. Pumori towers over Gorak Shep with it’s dry lake bed and seven or eight lodges. We decided on which lodge we would stay in, even though we did this quickly, retrospectively precious time was wasted doing it. I will write a separate post about lodges.

After lunch we walked across the dry lake bed to the brown hill behind me in the photo above. Looks innocent enough compared to the huge ice-covered mountains surrounding it but at this altitude Gorak Shep is 5170 metres, the climb to Kala Pattar and 5545 metres requires effort and pre-training to make that effort achievable.

The sky was almost cloud free and we had decided after talking to two people on the trail that we would climb there in the afternoon and leave the walk to Everest Base for the next morning when the morning light gives life to what is often viewed as a dull area. Most people generally decide to trek to Base Camp after lunch on the day they arrive.

Climbing Kala Patthar October 2015
The path to the top of Kala Pattar the hardest few hours of the trek for me.

The mountains of Lingtren, Khumbutse and Changste are in clear view and Everest begins to appear.

Kala Pattar means Black Rock named after the black rocks at the top of the hill. Some hill. The climb to the top or more precisely to the flag pole, took two hours. At one stage I was ahead which made a change, but then was overtaken by The Trainer. I waved him ahead because there were clouds behind us and we wanted the view and the photos without them. Basanta our wonderful porter guide stayed with me.

The climb was hard. In some ways it was easy in that there are not many rocks to watch for tripping etc and no stone steps. I could stop easily and find lots of perching spots and I didn’t have to worry about dodging yaks or porters with loads. I had to stop frequently to catch my breath and my legs were burning which I hadn’t experienced.

The hard bit was the large boulders we had to scramble over to get to the flag pole with the prayer flags. Quite close to the point where the flag pole was I thought I couldn’t go any further. Puffing, legs burning and exhausted I was ready to give up on the final bit and be happy with the view from there. Who said I had to climb to the top anyway?  I yelled out to Sam who was at the top. “Do I have to come to the top?” And what were the Trainer’s last words? “Come on Louise this is what you trained for!” he yelled back. And it was. So, with one last effort and with the help of Basanta pulling and pushing me up the last enormous boulders I made it to the flag pole. A very short video captures the moment I reached it, almost too exhausted to even wave for the camera and to the trainer who had his photographer hat on.

It took me a while to get my breath and then of course we stood and did the obligatory photo shoot being careful not to step backwards off the boulders. The afternoon clouds started to roll our way.

Mount Everest
Mount Everest cloud free from the top of Kala Pattar
On Kala Patthar with Mount Everest in the Background
Triumphant moments, happy snaps and the yellow wig.

And yes, then the wig appeared. The yellow wig. It had been purchased back home in Melbourne with the statement that the trainer intended to wear it at Base Camp. I told him what I thought of that idea and then forgot all about. It had been hidden in the luggage and then his bag and then in the day pack and the next thing, there it was. Two young Japanese boys up there with us thought it was hysterical. They loved it and borrowed it for some of their shots and it had a popular showing and sharing the next day at Base Camp. Basanta also liked it and he can be seen in some of those photos wearing it.

Triumphant Trekkers Above Everest Base Camp on Kala Patthar
Me, the Trainer and the Porter

So, a series of triumphant photos and videos where shot in different ways on different cameras with different photographers. Of course, the Open Door Singers sign appeared for the big moment.

We had made it. Safely and without any blisters even. The training had been spot on to getting us there without drama and worth it in many ways. Trekking in Nepal and trekking to Base Camp hadn’t been on my grand plan. Hadn’t been on any of my lists originally but I wasn’t going to be left behind and after the failed attempt to reach Base Camp in December 2013 it had felt like unfinished business. If you don’t succeed the first time, try again. I haven’t forgotten that if it hadn’t been for Sam the Trainer pushing me on, encouraging and teasing me and having the travel wanderlust I would have never have had the wonderful experience. Of course, I had an inkling on my honeymoon that I was in for a ride, when he dragged me across the Sahara.

And of course, the view was magnificent. Magic. Stunning. Many people cry at this point after the anticipation, the huge trek, the training, the preparation, the effort, for some maybe the pain, certainly the beauty and the grandeur. You are standing in the most enormous, magnificent landscape. You realise how insignificant you are in the scheme of things and how enduring and ancient the place you are privileged to be in, is. Astronauts experience this looking at earth from outer space. For those of us not aspiring to space travel this will be our astronaut moment.

Of course, I cried. I allowed myself that. I cried many times on this wonderful life changing trek. I can honestly say that except for a few tears on the way up to the top of Kala Pattar which I quickly stopped, telling myself it wasn’t that bad, none of the tears shed were in anger, pain, frustration or desperation. They were tears of happiness, tears of triumph, tears of disbelief and the very happy tears of relief of arriving in Lukla, fresh off the plane and being grateful that we had rethought our decision to cancel the trip due to the fear of a landslide or tremors after the earthquake.

We stayed up the top for quite a while after the photos just taking in the view. We were lucky there were only five people up there. One, because most people choose to climb to Kala Pattar early in the morning, two because it was very early in the second season after the monsoon and three due to the earthquakes, there were hardly any trekkers.

Retrospectively writing this post, it is worthwhile remembering the privilege to be able to do this trek with relative ease is thanks to the Sherpa people and all the other Nepalese people who work hard to bring food and gear up the trail every year so people can have this wonderful experience. It is particularly important to remember the back- breaking work of the men who carry building materials up the trail even all the way to Gorak Shep so that lodges can be built for people to stay in. Without them such an experience would not be possible.

I don’t have a bucket list, but if I did, climbing Kala Pattar would be on it. But I wouldn’t consider it ticked off because I had done it. Trekking in Nepal is addictive and I would like to think that I would do this trek again, at least one more time.

Other posts to read

At Everest Base Camp

Day Ten Dughla to Lobuche

Starting out Day One

The  Bridges

Save